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Child Maltreatment

Reports

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Research Brief

How Some States Use Title IV-E Foster Care Funding for Family-Based Facilities that Treat Substance Use Disorders

September 13, 2021
The Family First Prevention Services Act (FFPSA) permits states to use title IV-E foster care funding for children placed in foster care with their parent in a licensed residential family-based treatment facility for substance abuse. However, few states currently use this funding, due to barriers such as competing priorities and lack of facilities.

IV-E Prevention Toolkit: Understanding Roles of Funding and Decision Points

March 11, 2020
This toolkit aims to help states develop a plan for Title IV-E prevention services, and to assist states in planning a comprehensive array of services to help prevent the need for foster care placement (“prevention services”) by braiding Title IV-E prevention services reimbursement with Medicaid and other funding mechanisms.

IV-E Prevention Toolkit: Determining Priorities, Goals, and Actions

March 11, 2020
This toolkit aims to help states develop a plan for Title IV-E prevention services, and to assist states in planning a comprehensive array of services to help prevent the need for foster care placement (“prevention services”) by braiding Title IV-E prevention services reimbursement with Medicaid and other funding mechanisms.

IV-E Prevention Toolkit: Appendices

March 11, 2020
This toolkit aims to help states develop a plan for Title IV-E prevention services, and to assist states in planning a comprehensive array of services to help prevent the need for foster care placement (“prevention services”) by braiding Title IV-E prevention services reimbursement with Medicaid and other funding mechanisms.

IV-E Prevention Toolkit: Introduction to the Toolkit

March 11, 2020
This toolkit aims to help states develop a plan for Title IV-E prevention services, and to assist states in planning a comprehensive array of services to help prevent the need for foster care placement (“prevention services”) by braiding Title IV-E prevention services reimbursement with Medicaid and other funding mechanisms.

IV-E Prevention Toolkit: Developing a Plan for Title IV-E Prevention Services

March 11, 2020
This toolkit aims to help states develop a plan for Title IV-E prevention services, and to assist states in planning a comprehensive array of services to help prevent the need for foster care placement (“prevention services”) by braiding Title IV-E prevention services reimbursement with Medicaid and other funding mechanisms.

Title IV-E GAP Programs: A Work in Progress

February 5, 2018
The Fostering Connections to Success and Increasing Adoptions Act of 2008 provided states with the option to operate guardianship assistance programs (GAP) as part of their child welfare permanency continuum under Title IV-E of the Social Security Act.  The first of these programs began operating in 2010, though some states had operated guardianship programs under title IV-E demonstration progr
Research Brief

Differential Response and the Safety of Children Reported to Child Protective Services: A Tale of Six States

June 15, 2016
Differential response (DR) is an increasingly common model for how child protective services agencies address reports of child maltreatment. Differential response systems seek to be less adversarial than traditional child protective services by separating incoming referrals into two (or more) tracks.

Children in Nonparental Care: Findings from the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health

February 28, 2014
This ASPE Research Brief presents analyses of the 2011-2012 National Survey of Children's Health describing the characteristics, health and well-being of children who live with neither of their biological parents. The analysis compares children living with neither of their biological parents to children living with one or two biological parents.

Children in Nonparental Care

November 30, 2012
Typically, one or two parents and a child – along with any siblings – comprise a family, and the parents’ interactions with the child are a primary driver of the child’s development. Yet nearly 4 percent of U.S. children (nearly 3 million) live in homes with no parent present.