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Child Care

Reports

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Fact Sheet

Factsheet: Estimates of Child Care Eligibility and Receipt for Fiscal Year 2018

August 12, 2021
This factsheet provides descriptive information on child care eligibility and receipt. Of the 12.8 million children eligible for child care subsidies under federal rules, 15 percent received subsidies. Of the 8.4 million children eligible for child care subsidies under state rules, 23 percent received subsidies. Poorer children were more likely to receive subsidies than less poor children.

Improving Programs, Policies and Services to Promote Healthy Development in Middle Childhood in Afterschool Settings

March 16, 2021
This project was a collaborative effort by the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) and the Office of Women’s Health (OWH). This work examines how investments by the U.S.

Initial Implementation of the 2014 Reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant

February 3, 2021
This project examines the initial effects of policy changes required by the 2014 reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) program as well as the subsequent CCDF final rule published in September 2016 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).
Fact Sheet

Factsheet: Estimates of Child Care Eligibility and Receipt for Fiscal Year 2017

November 11, 2020
This factsheet provides descriptive information on child care eligibility and receipt. Of the 13.5 million children eligible for child care subsidies under federal rules, 14 percent received subsidies. Of the 8.7 million children eligible for child care subsidies under state rules, 22 percent received subsidies. Poorer children were more likely to receive subsidies than less poor children.

Supporting Employment among Lower-Income Mothers: Paid Family Leave and Child Care Arrangements

July 20, 2020
This is the third ASPE brief about a qualitative study examining lower-income mothers’ attachment to work around the time of childbirth and the role of state paid family leave (PFL) programs in supporting their return to employment. This brief focuses on the role of PFL in facilitating child care arrangements of a sample of mothers. Highlights are:

Early Care and Education Arrangements of Children under Age Five

July 14, 2020
Children under age five are about as likely to participate in nonparental care arrangements as they were in the mid-1990s. Children in nonparental care are now more likely to participate in center programs and less likely to receive care from family child care providers.

Employment and Wages in the Child Care Industry: Insight from the Great Recession

May 26, 2020
The COVID-19 pandemic is forcing child care providers across the country to close. Between February and April 2020, employment in the child care industry dropped by about one third, losing 360,000 jobs. We do not yet know how this will affect the longer-term economic health of this sector. This has implications for the supply, quality, and price of child care for low-income families.

The Cost of Subsidized Child Care: 2005-2016

October 24, 2019
This research brief presents findings using national data from child care subsidy administrative records that states submit to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The analysis shows that a greater percentage of subsidized care occurred in licensed child care centers in FY 2016 than in FY 2005.

Factsheet: Estimates of Child Care Eligibility & Receipt for Fiscal Year 2016

October 22, 2019
This factsheet provides descriptive information on child care eligibility and receipt. Of the 13.3 million children eligible for child care subsidies under federal rules, 15 percent received subsidies. Of the 8.5 million children eligible for child care subsidies under state rules, 24 percent received subsidies. Poorer children were more likely to receive subsidies than less poor children.

Factsheet: Estimates of Child Care Eligibility and Receipt for Fiscal Year 2015

January 16, 2019
This factsheet provides descriptive information on child care eligibility and receipt. Of the 13.6 million children eligible for child care subsidies under federal rules, 15 percent received subsidies. Of the 8.4 million children eligible for child care subsidies under state rules, 25 percent received subsidies. Poorer children were more likely to receive subsidies than less poor children.