Using Medicaid to Cover Services for Elderly Persons in Residential Care Settings: State Policy Maker and Stakeholder Views in Six States. Endnotes

12/01/2003

  1. Nursing Home Relocation Services, begun in 1982, are still an important part of Oregon's long term care system, though the average nursing home resident in 2002 is much more impaired. Because HCBS care coordination staff caseloads are high, some Area Agencies on Aging have created relocation specialist positions. Relocation costs may be paid by exempting resident income generally paid to the nursing home, or through the HCBS waiver program.

  2. Mollica, R.L. and Jenkens, R., State Assisted Living Practices and Options: A Guide for State Policy Makers, Coming Home Program, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, September 2001.

  3. Prior to February 2003, the state had a Medically Needy Program for the aged, blind and disabled, which covered only prescription drugs and mental health services, but not long term care. The program was terminated due to budget constraints.

  4. Sparer, M., Health Policy for Low-Income People in Oregon, Urban Institute, September, 1999.

  5. The state plans to increase the amount in 2003.

  6. A computerized scoring system weights and adds multiple measures of physical and mental functioning to determine if the criteria are met. The scoring system is also used to determine reimbursement levels for services provided through the waiver program.

  7. Sparer, M. op. cit.

  8. Kane, R. L., et. al., Oregon's LTC System: A Case Study by the National LTC Mentoring Program, University of Minnesota, April 1996.

  9. The income amount will be increased in July 2003.

  10. Kane, 1996, and Sparer, 1999, op. cit. It designated the newly created Senior Services Department (later renamed the Senior and Disabled Services Division and now called Seniors and People with Disabilities) as the state agency responsible for supervising and coordinating the various long term care programs for elderly persons. The legislation also delegated to the local Area Agencies on Aging (AAAs) the responsibility for developing a single point of entry for persons seeking long term care services.

  11. Kane, 1996, and Sparer, 1999.

  12. Oregon Revised Statutes 410.010.

  13. Kane, 1996.

  14. Oregon's Long Term Care Medicaid Caseload by Care Setting, July 2002, cited in Executive Summary of Governor's Task Force on the Future of Services to Seniors and People with Disabilities, Initial Report, September 2002.

  15. Kane, 1996.

  16. Sparer, 1999.

  17. Kane, 1996.

  18. Kane, 1996, and Sparer, 1999.

  19. Mollica, R.L., State Assisted Living Policy 2000, National Academy for State Health Policy; funded by The Retirement Research Foundation (LTC13). 2000.

  20. The state's SSI supplement is $1.70 per month, the minimum amount required by federal law as state maintenance of effort when the SSI program was first enacted in the early 1970's.

  21. Federal SSI limitations apply except that the transfer of a home may render a person ineligible for a state supplement for up to 30 months, based on the amount of uncompensated value.

  22. The state's SSI supplement is $1.70 per month, the minimum amount required by federal law as state maintenance of effort when the SSI program was first enacted in the early 1970's.

  23. Federal SSI limitations apply except that the transfer of a home may render a person ineligible for a state supplement for up to 30 months, based on the amount of uncompensated value.

  24. Managed risk: OAR 411-056-0015(2)(i) - (L) The facility must document the information set forth in (j) of this rule.

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