Studies of Welfare Populations: Data Collection and Research Issues. Improve Tracking and Tracing

06/01/2002

Clearly one primary theme taken from our review is the need to improve the ability of studies to find subjects. Most agencies face similar situations  the information used to track respondents is both relatively old (6-9 months) and limited. The age of the information could be addressed partly through methods such as those mentioned earlier  start contacting respondents immediately after they leave the program. Maintain this contact until the time to conduct the interview (e.g., 6 months after leaving). This approach, however, is relatively expensive to implement. Following subjects over extended periods of time can be labor intensive. Furthermore, the information provided when exiting the program may not have been updated for quite some time. This constraint is difficult to get around.

A more effective and cost-efficient method to improve contact information is to collect tracing contacts when the subjects initially enter the program. This type of information does not go out of date nearly as fast as a single name and address. Even if they go out of date, the names and addresses can provide additional leads that can be followed up by trackers. When collecting this information, it is important that the names are of persons who do not live with the subject. This decreases the possibility that if the subject moves, the contact person would have moved as well.

Another potentially rich source of information is case history documentation. Many of the studies reviewed above reported using information from other government databases, such as motor vehicles or other recipiency programs, to collect updated addresses and phone numbers. Examination of hardcopy case folders, if they exist, would be one way to supplement this information. One study reported doing this and found it was a good source for tracing contact information. Subjects, at some point, could have provided information on references, employers and friends as part of the application process. This information, if confidentiality issues can be addressed, can be examined to locate further leads to find and track those people who cannot be found.

To provide some perspective on the impact that tracing might have on the cost of a survey, we developed estimates of cost under two scenarios, one in which contact information is available and another in which it is not available. Costs for surveys of this type are difficult to estimate because so much depends on the ability of the data collector to monitor the process; the availability of skilled staff to carry out the tracing; and the nature and quality of information that is available at the start. The first two factors rest with the data collector while the latter depends on information obtained about each subject (and his or her accessibility) by the agency. If the data are not current or not complete, tracing is difficult and costly regardless of the controls the data collector has in place.

Under the assumptions described in Table 2-3, we estimate that approximately 600 fewer hours are required to trace 1,000 subjects if tracing contact information is available. Contact information, for this example, would have been obtained during the intake process and delivered to the data collector with the sample. The table may be somewhat deceptive because, for purposes of illustration, we have forced the two samples to have approximately the same location rate in order to compare the level of effort. In reality, the location rate (and consequently the response rate) for those with contact data would be higher than for those without.

In creating Table 2-3, we assumed the following times for each level of tracing. In practice, most of the welfare leaver studies have used both telephone and in-person surveys:

  • 20 minutes for calling through the contacts
  • 20 minutes for calls to the hits of database searches
  • 1 hour for intense telephone tracing
  • 7 hours for in-person tracing
TABLE 2-3:
Comparison of Tracing Hours, by Availability of Contact Information.
  (a)
No Tracing
(b)
Calling Contacts
(c)
Database Search
(d)
Intense Telephone Follow-up
(e)
In-person Tracing
(f)
Total
Tracing Time Per Sample Unit (minutes) 0 20 20 60 420  
With Contact Information
Sample size 1,000 700 490 343 240 1,000
Percent of cases located 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.30 0.15 0.80
Number located 300 210 147 103 36 796
Estimated number of hours 0 233 163 343 1,681 2,420
Without Contact Information
Sample size 1,000 N/A 700 469 314.23 1,000
Found rate 0.30   0.33 0.33 0.33 0.79
Number found 300   231 154.77 104 789
Estimated number of hours 0   233 469 2,200 2,902

Although these estimated times are reasonable, they also can be misleading. For example, if several databases are used (e.g., agency, credit bureau, DMV, commercial) each can produce a hit and require followup, so it is likely that more than one followup call might be carried out for some sample members, and none for others. In organizing a hit, care must be taken to make sure it is genuine and not a duplicate of an earlier hit that already has been invalidated. This adds time, though the process can be aided by a case management system.

The level of interviewer/tracer effort is only one dimension of cost. Supervisory hours will range between 20 to 40 percent of interviewer hours, depending on the activity, with the highest percentage needed for the intense tracing. Other variable labor costs include all clerical functions related to mailing and maintaining the case management system, and all direct nonlabor costs. These include, but are not limited to charges from database management companies to run files, directory assistance charges, telephone line charges, field travel expenses, and postage/express delivery charges.

Fixed costs include the management costs to coordinate the activities and the programming functions to develop a case management system; preparing files for data searches; updating files with results of data searches; and preparing labels for mailing.

A second important point to remember for agencies operating on a limited budget is to hire supervisory and interviewing staff who are experienced at locating subjects. Prudent screening of personnel, whether internal employees or external contractors, potentially have a big payoff with respect to maximizing the response rate. Strong supervisors are especially important because they can teach new interviewers methods of finding particular cases. They also can provide guidance and new ideas for experienced interviewers. The supervision has to be done on an interviewer-by-interviewer basis. Supervisors should review each case with interviewers on a frequent basis (e.g., every week) and provide feedback/advice on how to proceed with each one. This includes making sure the interviewer is following up with the leads that are in hand, as well as discussing ideas on how to generate more leads.

Effective locating and management of a survey cannot be learned on the job. Therefore, sponsoring agencies should gather evidence that the personnel involved have the appropriate experience and successful track record to complete the work successfully. This advice applies if using personnel within the sponsoring agency or through a contractor. When considering a contractor, the sponsoring agency should ask for hard evidence that a study like this has been conducted, and check references and evaluate success rates. Questions should be asked about the availability of experienced staff to complete the work. If the work is to be done by telephone, then some information on the track record of telephone tracers should be requested. For in-person contacts, information on the experience of personnel who reside in the local area where the study is to be conducted should be collected.

View full report

Preview
Download

"01.pdf" (pdf, 472.92Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"02.pdf" (pdf, 395.41Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"03.pdf" (pdf, 379.04Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"04.pdf" (pdf, 381.73Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"05.pdf" (pdf, 393.7Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"06.pdf" (pdf, 415.3Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"07.pdf" (pdf, 375.49Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"08.pdf" (pdf, 475.21Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"09.pdf" (pdf, 425.17Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"10.pdf" (pdf, 424.33Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"11.pdf" (pdf, 392.39Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"12.pdf" (pdf, 386.39Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"13.pdf" (pdf, 449.86Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"14.pdf" (pdf, 396.87Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®