Statutory Rape: A Guide to State Laws and Reporting Requirements. Sources

12/15/2004

Statutes from each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia were the primary sources of information for this report. Each state’s statutes were accessed via the Internet—usually through the state legislature’s Website. As of this writing, all of the statutes were current through at least 2003. This report is not intended to be a legal document. It relies on the most recent information available; however many of the state statutes referenced were unannotated. That said, every effort was made to search additional resources to learn of recent changes in the law or applicable case law and attorneys’ general opinions affecting the statutes.

In addition to the actual state statutes, a number of documents and on-line resources provided valuable supplementary information. These include:

  • Cornell University, Legal Information Institute. Constitutions, Statutes, and Codes. http://www.law.cornell.edu/statutes.html.
  • Davis, N. and Twombly, J. (2000). State Legislators’ Handbook for Statutory Rape Issues. Washington, D.C.: American Bar Association.
  • Donovan, P. (1997). “Special Report: Can Statutory Rape Laws Be Effective In Preventing Adolescent Pregnancy?” Family Planning Perspectives, 29(1): 30-34, 40.
  • Elstein, S., and Davis, N. (1997). Sexual Relationships Between Adult Males and Young Teen Girls: Exploring the Legal and Social Responses. New York: American Bar Association.
  • National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse (2003). Child Abuse Crimes: Sexual Offenses. Alexandria, VA: American Prosecutors Research Institute. http://www.ndaa-apri.org/pdf/child_abuse_crimes_sexual_offenses_state_statutes.pdf.
  • National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information (2002). Compendium of Laws: Reporting Laws (part of Child Abuse and Neglect State Statutes Series). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.
  • National Clearinghouse on Child Abuse and Neglect Information (2002). Issue Paper: Current Trends in Child Maltreatment Reporting Laws (part of Child Abuse and Neglect State Statutes Series). Washington, D.C.: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families.
  • Oberman, M. (2000). “Regulating Consensual Sex with Minors: Defining a Role for Statutory Rape,” Buffalo Law Review, 48: 703-784.
  • Phipps, C.A. (2003). “Misdirected Reform: On Regulating Consensual Sexual Activity Between Teenagers,” Cornell Journal of Law and Public Policy, 12: 373-445.

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