Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.532 - Transition Provisions

12/28/2000

Comment: Commenters urged the Department to clarify whether the "reach of the transition requirement" is limited to a particular time frame, to the provider's activities in a particular job, or work for a particular employer. For example, one commenter questioned how long a nurse is a covered entity after she moves from a job reviewing files with protected health information to an administrative job that does not handle protected health information; or whether an occupational health nurse who used to transmit first reports of injury to her company's workers' compensation carrier last year but no longer does so this year because of a carrier change still is a covered entity.

Response: Because this comment addresses a question of enforcement, we will address it in the enforcement regulation.

Comment: Several commenters sought clarification as to the application of the privacy rule to research already begun prior to the effective date or compliance date of the final rule. These commenters argued that applying the privacy rule to research already begun prior the rule's effective date would substantially overburden IRBs and that the resulting research interruptions could harm participants and threaten the reliability and validity of conclusions based upon clinical trial data. The commenters recommended that the rule grandfather in any ongoing research that has been approved by and is under the supervision of an IRB.

Response: We generally agree with the concerns raised by commenters. In the final rule, we have provided that covered entities may rely upon consents, authorizations, or other express legal permissions obtained from an individual for a specific research project that includes the treatment of individuals to use or disclose protected health information the covered entity obtained before or after the applicable compliance date of this rule as long as certain requirements are met. These consents, authorizations, or other express legal permissions may specifically permit a use or disclosure of individually identifiable health information for purposes of the project or be a general consent of the individual to participate in the project. A covered entity may use or disclose protected health information it created or received before or after the applicable compliance date of this rule for purposes of the project provided that the covered entity complies with all limitations expressed in the consent, authorization, or permission.

In regard to research projects that include the treatment of individuals, such as clinical trials, covered entities engaged in these projects will have obtained at least an informed consent from the individual to participate in the project. In some cases, the researcher may also have obtained a consent, authorization, or other express legal permission to use or disclose individually identifiable health information in a specific manner. To avoid disrupting ongoing research and because the participants have already agreed to participate in the project (which expressly permits or implies the use or disclosure of their protected health information), we have grandfathered in these consents, authorizations, and other express legal permissions.

It is unlikely that a research project that includes the treatment of individuals could proceed under the Common Rule with a waiver of informed consent. However, to the extent such a waiver has been granted, we believe individuals participating in the project should be able to determine how their protected health information is used or disclosed. Therefore, we require researchers engaged in research projects that include the treatment of individuals who obtained an IRB waiver of informed consent under the Common Rule to obtain an authorization or a waiver of such authorization from an IRB or a privacy board under § 164.512(i) of this rule.

If a covered entity obtained a consent, authorization, or other express legal permission from the individual who is the subject of the research, it would be able to rely upon that consent, authorization, or permission, consistent with any limitations it expressed, to use or disclose the protected health information it created or received prior to or after the compliance date of this regulation. If a covered entity wishes to use or disclose protected health information but no such consent, authorization, or permission exists, it must obtain an authorization pursuant to § 164.508 or obtain a waiver of authorization under § 164.512(i). To the extent such a project is ongoing and the researchers are unable to locate the individuals whose protected health information they are using or disclosing, we believe the IRB or privacy board under the criteria set forth in § 164.512(i) will be able to take that circumstance into account when conducting its review. In most instances, we believe this type of research will be able to obtain a waiver of authorization and be able to continue uninterrupted.

Comment: Several comments raised questions about the application of the rule to individually identifiable information created prior to (1) the effective date of the rule, and (2) the compliance dates of the rule. One commenter suggested that the rule should apply only to information gathered after the effective date of the final rule. A drug manufacturer asked what would be the effect of the rule on research on records compiled before the effective date of the rule.

Response: We disagree with the commenter's suggestion. The requirements of this regulation apply to all protected health information held by a covered entity, regardless of when or how the covered entity obtained the information. Congress required us to adopted privacy standards that apply to individually identifiable health information. While it limited the compliance date for health plans, covered health care providers, and healthcare clearinghouses, it did not provide similar limiting language with regard to individually identifiable health information. Therefore, uses and disclosures of protected health information made by a covered entity after the compliance date of this regulation must meet the requirements of these rules. Uses or disclosures of individually identifiable health information made prior to the compliance date are not affected; covered entities will not be sanctioned under this rule based on past uses or disclosures that are inconsistent with this regulation.

Consistent with the definition of individually identifiable health information in HIPAA, of which protected health information is a subset, we do not distinguish between protected health information in research records and protected health information in other records. Thus, a covered entity's research records are subject to this regulation to the extent they contain protected health information.