Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.522(a) - Right of An Individual to Request Restriction of Uses and Disclosures

12/28/2000

We proposed that individuals have the right to request that a covered health care provider restrict the use or disclosure of protected health information for treatment, payment, or health care operations. Providers would not have been required to agree to requested restrictions. However, a covered provider that agreed to a restriction could not use or disclose protected health information inconsistent with the restriction. The requirement would not have applied to permissible uses or disclosures under proposed § 164.510, including uses and disclosures in emergency circumstances under proposed § 164.510(k); when the health care services provided were emergency services; or to required disclosures to the Secretary under proposed § 164.522. We would have required covered providers to have procedures for individuals to request restrictions, for agreed-upon restrictions to be documented, for the provider to honor such restrictions, and for notification of the existence of a restriction to others to whom such protected health information is disclosed.

In the final rule, we retain the general right of an individual to request that uses and disclosures of protected health information be restricted and the requirement for covered entities to adhere to restrictions to which they have agreed. However, we include some significant changes and clarifications.

Under the final rule, we extend the right to request restrictions to health plans and to health care clearinghouses that create or receive protected health information other than as a business associate of another covered entity. All covered entities must permit individuals to request that uses and disclosures of protected health information to carry out treatment, payment, and health care operations be restricted and must adhere to restrictions to which they have agreed. A covered entity is not required to agree to a restriction. We note that restrictions between an individual and a covered entity for these or other purposes may be otherwise enforceable under other law.

Under § 164.522(a)(1)(i)(B), the right to request restrictions applies to disclosures to persons assisting in the individual's care under § 164.510(b). An individual may request that a covered entity agree not to disclose protected health information to persons assisting with the individual's care, even if such disclosure is permissible in accordance with § 164.510(b). For example, if an individual requests that a covered entity never disclose protected health information to a particular family member, and the covered entity agrees to that restriction, the covered entity is prohibited from disclosing protected health information to that family member, even if the disclosure would otherwise be permissible under § 164.510(b). We note that individuals additionally have the opportunity to agree or object to disclosures to persons assisting in the individual's care under § 164.510(b)(2). The individual retains the right to agree or object to such disclosures under § 164.510(b)(2), in accordance with the standards of that provision, regardless of whether the individual has requested a restriction under § 164.522(a). See § 164.510(b) and the corresponding preamble discussion regarding the individual's right to agree or object to disclosures to persons assisting in the individual's care.

In §§ 164.522(a)(1)(iii) and (iv) we clarify the requirements with respect to emergency treatment situations. In emergency treatment situations, a covered entity that has agreed to a restriction may use, or disclose to a health care provider, restricted protected health information that is necessary to provide the emergency treatment. If the covered entity discloses restricted protected health information to a health care provider for emergency treatment purposes, it must request that the provider not further use or disclose the information. We expect covered entities to consider the need for access to protected health information for treatment purposes when considering a request for a restriction, to discuss this need with the individual making the request for restriction, and to agree to restrictions that will not foreseeably impede the individual's treatment. Therefore, we expect covered entities will rarely need to use or disclose restricted protected health information in emergency treatment situations. We do not intend, however, to adversely impact the delivery of health care. We therefore provide a means for the use and disclosure of restricted protected health information in emergency treatment situations, where an unexpected need for the information could arise and there is insufficient time to secure the individual's permission to use or disclose the restricted information.

In § 164.522(a)(1)(v) we clarify that restrictions are not effective under this rule to prevent uses and disclosures required by § 164.502(a)(2)(ii) or permitted under § 164.510(a) (regarding facility directories) or § 164.512 (regarding uses and disclosures for which consent, individual authorization, or opportunity to agree or object is not required). Covered entities are permitted to agree to such restrictions, but if they do so, the restrictions are not enforceable under this rule. For example, a provider who makes a disclosure under § 164.512(j)(1)(i) relating to serious and imminent threats will not be in violation of this rule even if the disclosure is contrary to a restriction agreed to under this paragraph.

In § 164.522(a)(2) we clarify a covered entity's ability to terminate a restriction to which it has agreed. A covered entity may terminate a restriction with the individual's written or oral agreement. If the individual's agreement is obtained orally, the covered entity must document that agreement. A note in the medical record or similar notation is sufficient documentation. If the individual agrees to terminate the restriction, the covered entity may use and disclose protected health information as otherwise permitted under the rule. If the covered entity wants to terminate the restriction without the individual's agreement, it may only terminate the restriction with respect to protected health information it creates or receives after it informs the individual of the termination. The restriction continues to apply to protected health information created or received prior to informing the individual of the termination. That is, any protected health information that had been collected before the termination may not be used or disclosed in a way that is inconsistent with the restriction, but any information that is collected after informing the individual of the termination of the restriction may be used or disclosed as otherwise permitted under the rule.

In § 164.522(a)(3), we clarify that a covered entity must document a restriction to which it has agreed. We do not require a specific form of documentation; a note in the medical record or similar notation is sufficient. The documentation must be retained for six years from the date it was created or the date it was last in effect, whichever is later, in accordance with § 164.530(j).

We eliminate the requirement from the NPRM for covered entities to inform persons to whom they disclose protected health information of the existence of any restriction on that information. A restriction is only binding on the covered entity that agreed to the restriction. We encourage covered entities to inform others of the existence of a restriction when it is appropriate to do so. We note, however, that disclosure of the existence of a restriction often amounts to a de facto disclosure of the restricted information itself. If a restriction does not permit a covered entity to disclose protected health information to a particular person, the covered entity must carefully consider whether disclosing the existence of the restriction to that person would also violate the restriction.