Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.512(j) - Uses and Disclosures to Avert a Serious Threat to Health or Safety

12/28/2000

In the NPRM we proposed to allow covered entities to use or disclose protected health information without individual authorization - consistent with applicable law and ethics standards - based on a reasonable belief that use or disclosure of the protected health information was necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat to health or safety of an individual or of the public. Pursuant to the NPRM, covered entities could have used or disclosed protected health information in these emergency circumstances to a person or persons reasonably able to prevent or lessen the threat, including the target of the threat. The NPRM stated that covered entities that made disclosures in these circumstances were presumed to have acted under a reasonable belief if the disclosure was made in good faith, based on credible representation by a person with apparent knowledge or authority. The NPRM did not include verification requirements specific to this paragraph.

In § 164.512(j) of the final rule, we retain the NPRM's approach to uses and disclosures made to prevent or lessen serious and imminent threats to health or safety, as well as its language regarding the presumption of good faith. We also clarify that: (1) rules governing these situations, which the NPRM referred to as "emergency circumstances," are not intended to apply to emergency care treatment, such as health care delivery in a hospital emergency room; and (2) the "presumption of good faith belief" is intended to apply only to this provision and not to all disclosures permitted without individual authorization. The final rule allows covered entities to use or disclose protected health information without an authorization on their own initiative in these circumstances, when necessary to prevent or lessen a serious and imminent threat, consistent with other applicable ethical or legal standards.

The rule's approach is consistent with the "duty to warn" third persons at risk, which has been established through case law. In Tarasoff v. Regents of the University of California (17 Cal. 3d 425 (1976)), the Supreme Court of California found that when a therapist's patient had made credible threats against the physical safety of a specific person, the therapist had an obligation to use reasonable care to protect the intended victim of his patient against danger, including warning the victim of the danger. Many states have adopted, through either statutory or case law, versions of the Tarasoff duty to warn. The rule is not intended to create a duty to warn or disclose. Rather, it permits disclosure to avert a serious and imminent threat to health or safety consistent with other applicable legal or ethical standards. If disclosure in these circumstances is prohibited by state law, this rule would not allow the disclosure.

As indicated above, in some situations (for example, when a person is both a fugitive and a victim and thus covered entities could disclose protected health information pursuant either to § 164.512(f)(2) regarding fugitives or to § 164.512(f)(3) establishing conditions for disclosure about victims), more than one section of this rule potentially could apply with respect to a covered entity's potential disclosure of protected health information. Similarly, in situations involving a serious and imminent threat to public health or safety, law enforcement officials may be seeking protected health information from covered entities to locate a fugitive. In the final rule, we clarify that if a situation fits one section of the rule (for example, § 164.512(j) on serious and imminent threats to health or safety), covered entities may disclose protected health information pursuant to that section, regardless of whether the disclosure also could be made pursuant to another section (e.g., § 164.512(f)), regarding disclosure to law enforcement officials).

The proposed rule did not address situations in which covered entities could make disclosures to law enforcement officials about oral statements admitting participation in violent conduct or about escapees.

In the final rule we permit, but do not require, covered entities to use or disclose protected health information, consistent with applicable law and standards of ethical conduct, in specific situations in which the covered entity, in good faith, believes the use or disclosure is necessary to permit law enforcement authorities to identify or apprehend an individual. Under paragraph (j)(1)(ii)(A) of this section, a covered entity may take such action because of a statement by an individual admitting participation in a violent crime that the covered entity reasonably believes may have resulted in serious physical harm to the victim. The protected health information that is disclosed in this case is limited to the statement and to the protected health information included under the limited identifying and location information in § 164.512(f)(2), such as name, address, and type of injury. Under paragraph (j)(1)(ii)(B) of this section, a covered entity may take such action where it appears from all the circumstances that the individual has escaped from a correctional institution or from lawful custody.

A disclosure may not be made under paragraph (j)(1)(ii)(A) for a statement admitting participation in a violent crime if the covered entity learns the information in the course of counseling or therapy. Similarly, such a disclosure is not permitted if the covered entity learns the information in the course of treatment to affect the propensity to commit the violent crimes that are described in the individual's statements. We do not intend to discourage individuals from speaking accurately in the course of counseling or therapy sessions, or to discourage other treatment that specifically seeks to reduce the likelihood that someone who has acted violently in the past will do so again in the future. This prohibition on disclosure is triggered once an individual has made a request to initiate or be referred to such treatment, therapy, or counseling.

The provision permitting use and disclosure has been added in light of the broadened definition in the final rule of protected health information. Under the NPRM, protected health information meant individually identifiable health information that is or has been electronically transmitted or electronically maintained by a covered entity. Under the final rule, protected health information includes information transmitted by electronic media as well as such information transmitted or maintained in any other form or medium. The new definition includes oral statements to covered entities as well as individually identifiable health information transmitted "in any other form."

The definition of protected health information, for instance, would now apply to a statement by a patient that is overheard by a hospital security guard in a waiting room. Such a statement would have been outside the scope of the proposed rule (unless it was memorialized in an electronic record), but is within the scope of the final rule. For the example with the hospital guard, the new provision permitting disclosure of a statement by an individual admitting participation in a violent crime would have the same effect as the proposed rule -- the statement could be disclosed to law enforcement, so long as the other aspects of the regulation are followed. Similarly, where it appears from all the circumstances that the individual has escaped from prison, the expanded definition of protected health information should not prevent the covered entity from deciding to report this information to law enforcement.

The disclosures that covered entities may elect to make under this paragraph are entirely at their discretion. These disclosures to law enforcement are in addition to other disclosure provisions in the rule. For example, under paragraph § 164.512(f)(2) of this section, a covered entity may disclose limited categories of protected health information in response to a request from a law enforcement official for the purpose of identifying or locating a suspect, fugitive, material witness, or missing person. Paragraph § 164.512(f)(1) of this section permits a covered entity to make disclosures that are required by other laws, such as state mandatory reporting laws, or are required by legal process such as court orders or grand jury subpoena.