Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.512(g) - Uses and Disclosures about Decedents

12/28/2000

Coroners and Medical Examiners

Comment: We received several comments, for example, from state and county health departments, a private foundation, and a provider organization, in support of the NPRM provision allowing disclosure without authorization to coroners and medical examiners.

Response: The final rule retains the NPRM's basic approach to disclosure of coroners and medical examiners. It allows covered entities to disclose protected health information without authorization to coroners and medical examiners, for identification of a deceased person, determining cause of death, or other duties authorized by law.

Comment: In the preamble to the NPRM, we said we had considered but rejected the option of requiring covered entities to redact from individuals' medical records any information identifying other persons before disclosing the record to a coroner or medical examiner. We solicited comment on whether health care providers routinely identify other persons specifically in an individual's medical record and if so, whether in the final rule we should require health care providers to redact information about the other person before providing it to a coroner or medical examiner.

A few commenters said that medical records typically do not include information about persons other than the patient. One commenter said that patient medical records occasionally reference others such as relatives or employers. These commenters recommended requiring redaction of such information in any report sent to a coroner or medical examiner. On the other hand, other commenters said that redaction should not be required. These commenters generally based their recommendation on the burden and delay associated with redaction. In addition to citing the complexity and time involved in redaction of medical records provided to coroners, one commenter said that health plans and covered health care providers were not trained to determine the identifiable information necessary for coroners and medical examiners to do thorough investigations. Another commenter said that redaction should not be required because coroners and medical examiners needed some additional family information to determine what would be done with the deceased after their post-mortem investigation is completed.

Response: We recognize the burden associated with redacting medical records to remove the names of persons other than the patient. In addition, as stated in the preamble to the NPRM, we recognize that there is a limited time period after death within which an autopsy must be conducted. We believe that the delay associated with this burden could make it impossible to conduct a post-mortem investigation within the required time frame. In addition, we agree that health plans and covered health care providers may lack the training necessary to determine the identifiable information necessary for coroners and medical examiners to do thorough investigations. Thus, in the final rule, we do not require health plans or covered providers to redact information about persons other than the patient who may be identified in a patient's medical record before disclosing the record to a coroner or medical examiner.

Comment: One commenter said that medical records sent to coroners and medical examiners were considered their work product and thus were not released from their offices to anyone else. The commenter recommended that HHS establish regulations on how to dispose of medical records and that we create a "no re-release" statement to ensure that individual privacy is maintained without compromising coroners' or medical examiners' access to protected health information. The organization said that such a policy should apply regardless of whether the investigation was civil or criminal.

Response: HIPAA does not provide HHS with statutory authority to regulate coroners' or medical examiners' re-use or re-disclosure of protected health information unless the coroner or medical examiner is also a covered entity. However, we consistently have supported comprehensive privacy legislation to regulate disclosure and use of individually identifiable health information by all entities that have access to it.

Funeral Directors

Comment: One commenter recommended modifying the proposed rule to allow disclosure without authorization to funeral directors. To accomplish this change, the commenter suggested either: (1) adding another subsection to proposed § 164.510 of the NPRM, to allow disclosure without authorization to funeral directors as needed to make arrangements for funeral services and for disposition of a deceased person's remains; or (2) revising proposed § 164.510(e) to allow disclosure of protected health information to both coroners and funeral directors. According to this commenter, funeral directors often need certain protected health information for the embalming process, because a person's medical condition may affect the way in which embalming is performed. For example, the commenter noted, funeral directors increasingly receive bodies after organ and tissue donation, which has implications for funeral home staff duties associated with embalming.

Response: We agree with the commenter. In the final rule, we permit covered entities to disclose protected health information to funeral directors, consistent with applicable law, as necessary to carry out their duties with respect to a decedent. When necessary for funeral directors to carry out their duties, covered entities may disclose protected health information prior to and in reasonable anticipation of the individual's death.

Comment: One commenter recommended clarifying in the final rule that it does not restrict law enforcement agencies' release of medical information that many state records laws require to be reported, for example, as part of autopsy reports. The commenter recommended stating that law enforcement officials may independently gather medical information, that such information would not be covered by these rules, and that it would continue to be covered under applicable state and federal access laws.

Response: HIPAA does not give HHS statutory authority to regulate law enforcement officials' use or disclosure of protected health information. As stated elsewhere, we continue to support enactment of comprehensive privacy legislation to cover disclosure and use of all individually identifiable health information.

Comment: One commenter recommended prohibiting health plans and covered health care providers from disclosing psychotherapy notes to coroners or medical examiners.

Response: We disagree with the commenter who asserted that psychotherapy notes should only be used by or disclosed to coroners and medical examiners with authorization. Psychotherapy notes are sometimes needed by coroners and medical examiners to determine cause of death, such as in cases where suicide is suspected as the cause of death. We understand that several states require the disclosure of protected health information, including psychotherapy notes, to medical examiners and coroners. However, in the absence of a state law requiring such disclosure, we do not intend to prohibit coroners or medical examiners from obtaining the protected health information necessary to determine an individual's cause of death.