Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.512(d) - Uses and Disclosures for Health Oversight Activities

12/28/2000

Under § 164.510(c) of the NPRM, we proposed to permit covered entities to disclose protected health information to health oversight agencies for oversight activities authorized by law, including audit, investigation, inspection, civil, criminal, or administrative proceeding or action, or other activity necessary for appropriate oversight of: (i) the health care system; (ii) government benefit programs for which health information is relevant to beneficiary eligibility; or (iii) government regulatory programs for which health information is necessary for determining compliance with program standards.

In § 164.512(d) of the final rule, we modify the proposed language to include civil and criminal investigations. In describing "other activities necessary for oversight" of particular entities, we add the phrase "entities subject to civil rights laws for which health information is necessary for determining compliance." In addition, in the final rule, we add "licensure or disciplinary actions" to the list of oversight activities authorized by law for which covered entities may disclose protected health information to health oversight agencies. The NPRM's definition of "health oversight agency" (in proposed § 164.504) included this phrase, but it was inadvertently excluded from the regulation text at proposed § 164.510(c). We make this change in the regulation text of the final rule to conform to the NPRM's definition of health oversight agency and to reflect the full range of activities for which we intend to allow covered entities to disclose protected health information to health oversight agencies.

The NPRM would have allowed, but would not have required, covered entities to disclose protected health information to public oversight agencies and to private entities acting under grant of authority from or under contract with oversight agencies for oversight purposes without individual authorization for health oversight activities authorized by law. When a covered entity was also an oversight agency, it also would have been permitted to use protected health information in all cases in which it would have been allowed to disclose such information for health oversight purposes. The NPRM would not have established any new administrative or judicial process prior to disclosure for health oversight, nor would it have permitted disclosures forbidden by other law. The proposed rule also would not have created any new right of access to health records by oversight agencies, and it could not have been used as authority to obtain records not otherwise legally available to the oversight agency.

The final rule retains this approach to health oversight. As in the NPRM, the final rule provides that when a covered entity is also an oversight agency, it is allowed to use protected health information in all cases in which it is allowed to disclose such information for health oversight purposes. For example, if a state insurance department is acting as a health plan in operating the state's Medicaid managed care program, the final rule allows the insurance department to use protected health information in all cases for which the plan can disclose the protected health information for health oversight purposes. For example, the state insurance department in its capacity as the state Medicaid managed care plan can use protected health information in the process of investigating and disciplining a state Medicaid provider for attempting to defraud the Medicaid system. As in the NPRM, the final rule does not establish any new administrative or judicial process prior to disclosure for health oversight, nor does it prohibit covered entities from making any disclosures for health oversight that are otherwise required by law. Like the NPRM, it does not create any new right of access to health records by oversight agencies and it cannot be used as authority to obtain records not otherwise legally available to the oversight agency.

Overlap Between Law Enforcement and Oversight

Under the NPRM, the proposed definitions of law enforcement and oversight, and the rules governing disclosures for these purposes overlapped. Specifically, this overlap occurred because: (1) the NPRM preamble, but not the NPRM regulation text, indicated that agencies conducting both oversight and law enforcement activities would be subject to the oversight requirements when conducting oversight activities; and (2) the NPRM addressed some disclosures for investigations of health care fraud in the law enforcement paragraph (proposed § 164.510(f)(5)(i)), while health care fraud investigations are central to the purpose of health care oversight agencies (covered under proposed § 164.510(c)). In the final rule, we make substantial changes to these provisions, in an attempt to prevent confusion.

In § 164.512(d)(2), we include explicit decision rules indicating when an investigation is considered law enforcement and when an investigation is considered oversight under this regulation. An investigation or activity is not considered health oversight for purposes of this rule if: (1) the individual is the subject of the investigation or activity; and (2) the investigation or activity does not arise out of and is not directly related to: (a) the receipt of health care; (b) a claim for public benefits related to health; or (c) qualification for, or receipt of public benefits or services where a patient's health is integral to the claim for benefits or services. In such cases, where the individual is the subject of the investigation and the investigation does not relate to issues (a) through (c), the rules regarding disclosure for law enforcement purposes (see § 164.512(f)) apply. For the purposes of this rule, we intend for investigations regarding issues (a) through (c) above to mean investigations of health care fraud.

Where the individual is not the subject of the activity or investigation, or where the investigation or activity relates to the subject matter in (a) through (c) of the preceding sentence, a covered entity may make a disclosure pursuant to § 164.512(d)(1). For example, when the U.S. Department of Labor's Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration (PWBA) needs to analyze protected health information about health plan enrollees in order to conduct an audit or investigation of the health plan (i.e., the enrollees are not subjects of the investigation) to investigate potential fraud by the plan, the health plan may disclose protected health information to the PWBA under the health oversight rules. These rules and distinctions are discussed in greater detail in our responses to comments.

To clarify further that health oversight disclosure rules apply generally in health care fraud investigations (subject to the exception described above), in the final rule, we eliminate proposed § 164.510(f)(5)(i), which would have established requirements for disclosure related to health care fraud for law enforcement purposes. All disclosures of protected health information that would have been permitted under proposed § 164.510(f)(5)(i) are permitted under § 164.512(d).

In the final rule, we add new language (§ 164.512(d)(3)) to address situations in which health oversight activities are conducted in conjunction with an investigation regarding a claim for public benefits not related to health (e.g., claims for Food Stamps). In such situations, for example, when a state Medicaid agency is working with the Food Stamps program to investigate suspected fraud involving Medicaid and Food Stamps, covered entities may disclose protected health information to the entities conducting the joint investigation under the health oversight provisions of the rule.

In the proposed rule, the definitions of "law enforcement proceeding" and "oversight activity" both included the phrase "criminal, civil, or administrative proceeding." For reasons explained below, the final rule retains this phrase in both definitions. The final rule does not attempt to distinguish between these activities based on the agency undertaking them or the applicable enforcement procedures. Rather, as described above, the final rule carves out certain activities which must always be considered law enforcement for purposes of disclosure of protected health information under this rule.

Additional Considerations

We note that covered entities are permitted to initiate disclosures that are permitted under this paragraph. For example, a covered entity could disclose protected health information in the course of reporting suspected health care fraud to a health oversight agency.

We delete language in the NPRM that would have allowed disclosure under this section only to law enforcement officials conducting or supervising an investigation, official inquiry, or a criminal, civil or administrative proceeding authorized by law. In some instances, a disclosure by a covered entity under this section will initiate such an investigation or proceeding, but it will not already be ongoing at the time the disclosure is made.