Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.512(b) - Uses and Disclosures for Public Health Activities

12/28/2000

The NPRM would have allowed covered entities to disclose protected health information without individual authorization to: (1) a public health authority authorized by law to collect or receive such information for the purpose of preventing or controlling disease, injury, or disability, including, but not limited to, the reporting of disease, injury, vital events such as birth or death, and the conduct of public health surveillance, public health investigations, and public health interventions; (2) a public health authority or other appropriate authority authorized by law to receive reports of child abuse or neglect; (3) a person or entity other than a governmental authority that could demonstrate or demonstrated that it was acting to comply with requirements or direction of a public health authority; or (4) a person who may have been exposed to a communicable disease or may otherwise be at risk of contracting or spreading a disease or condition and was authorized by law to be notified as necessary in the conduct of a public health intervention or investigation.

In the final rule, we broaden the scope of permissible disclosures pursuant to item (1) listed above. We narrow the scope of disclosures permissible under item (3) of this list, and we add language to clarify the scope of permissible disclosures with respect to item (4) on the list. We broaden the scope of allowable disclosures regarding item (1) by allowing covered entities to disclose protected health information not only to U.S. public health authorities but also, at the direction of a public health authority, to an official of a foreign government agency that is acting in collaboration with a public health authority. For example, we allow covered entities to disclose protected health information to a foreign government agency that is collaborating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to limit the spread of infectious disease.

We narrow the conditions under which covered entities may disclose protected health information to non-government entities. We allow covered entities to disclose protected health information to a person subject to the FDA's jurisdiction, for the following activities: to report adverse events (or similar reports with respect to food or dietary supplements), product defects or problems, or biological product deviations, if the disclosure is made to the person required or directed to report such information to the FDA; to track products if the disclosure is made to a person required or directed by the FDA to track the product; to enable product recalls, repairs, or replacement, including locating and notifying individuals who have received products regarding product recalls, withdrawals, or other problems; or to conduct post-marketing surveillance to comply with requirements or at the direction of the FDA.

The terms included in § 164.512(b)(iii) are intended to have both their commonly understood meanings, as well as any specialized meanings, pursuant to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (21 U.S.C. 321 et seq.) or the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 201 et seq.). For example, "post-marketing surveillance" is intended to mean activities related to determining the safety or effectiveness of a product after it has been approved and is in commercial distribution, as well as certain Phase IV (post-approval) commitments by pharmaceutical companies. With respect to devices, "post-marketing surveillance" can be construed to refer to requirements of section 522 of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act regarding certain implanted, life-sustaining, or life-supporting devices. The term "track" includes, for example, tracking devices under section 519(e) of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, units of blood or other blood products, as well as trace-backs of contaminated food.

In § 164.512(b)(iii), the term "required" refers to requirements in statute, regulation, order, or other legally binding authority exercised by the FDA. The term "directed," as used in this section, includes other official agency communications such as guidance documents.

We note that under this provision, a covered entity may disclose protected health information to a non-governmental organization without individual authorization for inclusion in a private data base or registry only if the disclosure is otherwise for one of the purposes described in this provision (e.g., for tracking products pursuant to FDA direction or requirements, for post-marketing surveillance to comply with FDA requirements or direction.)

To make a disclosure that is not for one of these activities, covered entities must obtain individual authorization or must meet the requirements of another provision of this rule. For example, covered entities may disclose protected health information to employers for inclusion in a workplace surveillance database only: with individual authorization; if the disclosure is required by law; if the disclosure meets the requirements of § 164.512(b)(v); or if the disclosure meets the conditions of another provision of this regulation, such as § 154.512(i) relating to research. Similarly, if a pharmaceutical company seeks to create a registry containing protected health information about individuals who had taken a drug that the pharmaceutical company had developed, covered entities may disclose protected health information without authorization to the pharmaceutical company pursuant to FDA requirements or direction. If the pharmaceutical company's registry is not for any of these purposes, covered entities may disclose protected health information to it only with patient authorization, if required by law, or if disclosure meets the conditions of another provision of this rule.

The final rule continues to permit covered entities to disclose protected health information without individual authorization directly to public health authorities, such as the Food and Drug Administration, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as state and local public health departments, for public health purposes as specified in the NPRM.

The final rule retains the NPRM provision allowing covered entities to disclose protected health information to public health authorities or other appropriate government authorities authorized by law to receive reports of child abuse or neglect. In addition, we clarify the NPRM's provision regarding disclosure of protected health information to persons who may have been exposed to a communicable disease or who may otherwise be at risk of contracting or spreading a disease or condition. Under the final rule, covered entities may disclose protected health information to such individuals when the covered entity or public health authority is authorized by law to notify these individuals as necessary in the conduct of a public health intervention or investigation.

In addition, as in the NPRM, under the final rule, a covered entity that is acting as a public health authority - for example, a public hospital conducting infectious disease surveillance in its role as an arm of the public health department - may use protected health information in all cases for which it is allowed to disclose such information for public health activities as described above.

The proposed rule did not contain a specific provision relating to disclosures by covered health care providers to employers concerning work-related injuries or illnesses or workplace medical surveillance. Under the proposed rule, a covered entity would have been permitted to disclose protected health information without individual authorization for public health purposes to private person if the person could demonstrate that it was acting to comply with requirements or at the direction of a public health authority.

As discussed above, in the final rule we narrow the scope of this paragraph as it applies to disclosures to persons other than public health authorities. To ensure that covered health care providers may make disclosures of protected health information without individual authorization to employers when appropriate under federal and state laws addressing work-related injuries and illnesses or workplace medical surveillance, we include a new provision in the final rule. The provision permits covered health care providers who provide health care as a workforce member of or at the request of an employer to disclose to that employer protected health information concerning work-related injuries or illnesses or workplace medical surveillance in situations where the employer has a duty under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act, or under a similar state law, to keep records on or act on such information. For example, OSHA regulations in 29 CFR Part 1904 require employers to record work-related injuries and illnesses if medical treatment is necessary; MSHA regulations at 30 CFR Part 50 require mine operators to report injuries and illnesses experienced by miners. Similarly, OSHA rules require employers to monitor employees' exposure to certain substances and to remove employees from exposure when toxic thresholds have been met. To obtain the relevant health information necessary to determine whether an injury or illness should be recorded, or whether an employee must be medically removed from exposure at work, employers must refer employees to health care providers for examination and testing.

OSHA and MSHA rules do not impose duties directly upon health care providers to disclose health information pertaining to recordkeeping and medical monitoring requirements to employers. Rather, these rules operate on the presumption that health care providers who provide services at the request of an employer will be able to disclose to the employer work-related health information necessary for the employer to fulfill its compliance obligations. This new provision permits covered entities to make disclosures necessary for the effective functioning of OSHA and MSHA requirements, or those of similar state laws, by permitting a health care provider to make disclosures without the authorization of the individual concerning work-related injuries or illnesses or workplace medical surveillance in situations where the employer has a duty under OSHA and MSHA requirements, or under a similar state laws, to keep records on or act on such information.

We require health care providers who make disclosures to employers under this provision to provide notice to individuals that it discloses protected health information to employers relating to the medical surveillance of the workplace and work-related illnesses and injuries. The notice required under this provision is separate from the notice required under § 164.520. The notice required under this provision may be met giving a copy of the notice to the individual at the time it provides the health care services, or, if the health care services are provided on the work site of the employer, by posting the notice in a prominent place at the location where the health care services are provided.

This provision applies only when a covered health care provider provides health care services as a workforce member of or at the request of an employer and for the purposes discussed above. The provision does not affect the application of this rule to other health care provided to individuals or to their relationship with health care providers that they select.