Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Section 164.504(e) - Business Associates

12/28/2000

In the NPRM, we proposed to require a contract between a covered entity and a business associate, except for disclosures of protected health information by a covered entity that is a health care provider to another health care provider for the purposes of consultation or referral. A covered entity would have been in violation of this rule if the covered entity knew or reasonably should have known of a material breach of the contract by a business associate and it failed to take reasonable steps to cure the breach or terminate the contract. We proposed in the preamble that when a covered entity acted as a business associate to another covered entity, the covered entity that was acting as business associate also would have been responsible for any violations of the regulation.

We also proposed that covered health care providers receiving protected health information for consultation or referral purposes would still have been subject to this rule, and could not have used or disclosed such protected health information for a purpose other than the purpose for which it was received (i.e., the consultation or referral). Further, we noted that providers making disclosures for consultations or referrals should be careful to inform the receiving provider of any special limitations or conditions to which the disclosing provider had agreed to impose (e.g., the disclosing provider had provided notice to its patients that it would not make disclosures for research).

We proposed that business associates would not have been permitted to use or disclose protected health information in ways that would not have been permitted of the covered entity itself under these rules, and covered entities would have been required to take reasonable steps to ensure that protected health information disclosed to a business associate remained protected.

In the NPRM (proposed § 164.506(e)(2)) we would have required that the contractual agreement between a covered entity and a business associate be in writing and contain provisions that would:

• Prohibit the business associate from further using or disclosing the protected health information for any purpose other than the purpose stated in the contract.

• Prohibit the business associate from further using or disclosing the protected health information in a manner that would violate the requirements of this proposed rule if it were done by the covered entity.

• Require the business associate to maintain safeguards as necessary to ensure that the protected health information is not used or disclosed except as provided by the contract.

• Require the business associate to report to the covered entity any use or disclosure of the protected health information of which the business associate becomes aware that is not provided for in the contract.

• Require the business associate to ensure that any subcontractors or agents to whom it provides protected health information received from the covered entity will agree to the same restrictions and conditions that apply to the business associate with respect to such information.

• Require the business associate to provide access to non-duplicative protected health information to the subject of that information, in accordance with proposed § 164.514(a).

• Require the business associate to make available its internal practices, books and records relating to the use and disclosure of protected health information received from the covered entity to the Secretary for the purposes of enforcing the provisions of this rule.

• Require the business associate, at termination of the contract, to return or destroy all protected health information received from the covered entity that the business associate still maintains in any form to the covered entity and prohibit the business associate from retaining such protected health information in any form.

• Require the business associate to incorporate any amendments or corrections to protected health information when notified by the covered entity that the information is inaccurate or incomplete.

• State that individuals who are the subject of the protected health information disclosed are intended to be third party beneficiaries of the contract.

• Authorize the covered entity to terminate the contract, if the covered entity determines that the business associate has violated a material term of the contract.

We also stated in the preamble to the NPRM that the contract could have included any additional arrangements that did not violate the provisions of this regulation.

We explained in the preamble to the NPRM that a business associate (including business associates that are covered entities) that had contracts with more than one covered entity would have had no authority to combine, aggregate or otherwise use for a single purpose protected health information obtained from more than one covered entity unless doing so would have been a lawful use or disclosure for each of the covered entities that supplied the protected health information that is being combined, aggregated or used. In addition, the business associate would have had to have been authorized through the contract or arrangement with each covered entity that supplied the protected health information to combine or aggregate the information. A covered entity would not have been permitted to obtain protected health information through a business associate that it could not otherwise obtain itself.

In the final rule we retain the overall approach proposed: covered entities may disclose protected health information to persons that meet the rule's definition of business associate, or hire such persons to obtain or create protected health information for them, only if covered entities obtain specified satisfactory assurances from the business associate that it will appropriately handle the information; the regulation specifies the elements of such satisfactory assurances; covered entities have responsibilities when such specified satisfactory assurances are violated by the business associate. We retain the requirement that specified satisfactory assurances must be obtained if a covered entity's business associate is also a covered entity. We note that a master business associate contract or MOU that otherwise meets the requirements regarding specified satisfactory assurances meets the requirements with respect to all the signatories.

A covered entity may disclose protected health information to a business associate, consistent with the other requirements of the final rule, as necessary to permit the business associate to perform functions and activities for or on behalf of the covered entity, or to provide the services specified in the business associate definition to or for the covered entity. As discussed below, a business associate may only use the protected health information it receives in its capacity as a business associate to a covered entity as permitted by its contract or agreement with the covered entity.

We do not attempt to directly regulate business associates, but pursuant to our authority to regulate covered entities we place restrictions on the flow of information from covered entities to non-covered entities. We add a provision to clarify that a violation of a business associate agreement by a covered entity that is a business associate of another covered entity constitutes a violation of this rule.

In the final rule, we make significant changes to the requirements regarding business associates. As explained below in more detail: we make significant changes to the content of the required contractual satisfactory assurances; we include exceptions for arrangements that would otherwise meet the definition of business associate; we make special provisions for government agencies that by law cannot enter into contracts with one another or that operate under other legal requirements incompatible with some aspects of the required contractual satisfactory assurances; we provide a new mechanism for covered entities to hire a third party to aggregate data.

The final rule provides several exception to the business associate requirements, where a business associate relationship would otherwise exist. We substantially expand the exception for disclosure of protected health information for treatment. Rather than allowing disclosures without business associate assurances only for the purpose of consultation or referral, in the final rule we allow covered entities to make any disclosure of protected health information for treatment purposes to a health care provider without a business associate arrangement. This provision includes all activities that fall under the definition of treatment.

We do not require a business associate contract for a group health plan to make disclosures to the plan sponsor, to the extent that the health plan meets the applicable requirements of § 164.504(f).

We also include an exception for certain jointly administered government programs providing public benefits. Where a health plan that is a government program provides public benefits, such as SCHIP and Medicaid, and where eligibility for, or enrollment in, the health plan is determined by an agency other than the agency administering the health plan, or where the protected health information used to determine enrollment or eligibility in the health plan is collected by an agency other than the agency administering the health plan, and the joint activities are authorized by law, no business associate contract is required with respect to the collection and sharing of individually identifiable health information for the performance of the authorized functions by the health plan and the agency other than the agency administering the health plan. We note that the phrase "government programs providing public benefits" refers to programs offering benefits to specified members of the public and not to programs that offer benefits only to employees or retirees of government agencies.

We note that we do not consider a financial institution to be acting on behalf of a covered entity, and therefore no business associate contract is required, when it processes consumer-conducted financial transactions by debit, credit or other payment card, clears checks, initiates or processes electronic funds transfers, or conducts any other activity that directly facilitates or effects the transfer of funds for compensation for health care. A typical consumer-conducted payment transaction is when a consumer pays for health care or health insurance premiums using a check or credit card. In these cases, the identity of the consumer is always included and some health information (e.g., diagnosis or procedure) may be implied through the name of the health care provider or health plan being paid. Covered entities that initiate such payment activities must meet the minimum necessary disclosure requirements described in the preamble to § 164.514.

In the final rule, we reduce the extent to which a covered entity must monitor the actions of its business associate and we make it easier for covered entities to identify the circumstances that will require them to take actions to correct a business associate's material violation of the contract, in the following ways. We delete the proposed language requiring covered entities to "take reasonable steps to ensure" that each business associate complies with the rule's requirements. Additionally, we now require covered entities to take reasonable steps to cure a breach or terminate the contract for business associate behaviors only if they know of a material violation by a business associate. In implementing this standard, we will view a covered entity that has substantial and credible evidence of a violation as knowing of such violation. While this standard relieves the covered entity of the need to actively monitor its business associates, a covered entity nonetheless is expected to investigate when they receive complaints or other information that contain substantial and credible evidence of violations by a business associate, and it must act upon any knowledge of such violation that it possesses. We note that a whistleblowing disclosure by a business associate of a covered entity that meets the requirements of § 164.502(j)(1) does not put the covered entity in violation of this rule, and the covered entity has no duty to correct or cure, or to terminate the relationship.

We also qualify the requirement for terminating contracts with non-compliant business associates. The final rule still requires that the business associate contract authorize the covered entity to terminate the contract, if the covered entity determines that the business associate has violated a material term of the contract, and it requires the covered entity to terminate the contract if steps to cure such a material breach fail. The rule now stipulates, however, that if the covered entity is unable to cure a material breach of the business associate's obligation under the contract, it is expected to terminate the contract, when feasible. This qualification has been added to accommodate circumstances where terminating the contract would be unreasonably burdensome on the covered entity, such as when there are no viable alternatives to continuing a contract with that particular business associate. It does not mean, for instance, that the covered entity can choose to continue the contract with a non-compliant business associate merely because it is more convenient or less costly than contracts with other potential business associates. We also require that if a covered entity determines that it is not feasible to terminate a non-compliant business associate, the covered entity must notify the Secretary.

We retain all of the requirements for a business associate contract that were listed in proposed § 164.506(e)(2), with some modifications. See § 164.504(e)(2).

We retain the requirement that the business associate contract must provide that the business associate will not use or further disclose the information other than as permitted or required by the contract or as required by law. We do not mean by this requirement that the business associate contract must specify each and every use and disclosure of protected health information permitted to the business associate. Rather, the contract must state the purposes for which the business associate may use and disclose protected health information, and must indicate generally the reasons and types of persons to whom the business associate may make further disclosures. For example, attorneys often need to provide information to potential witnesses, opposing counsel, and others in the course of their representation of a client. The business associate contract pursuant to which protected health information is provided to its attorney may include a general statement permitting the attorney to disclose protected health information to these types of people, within the scope of its representation of the covered entity.

We retain the requirement that a business associate contract may not authorize a business associate to use or further disclose protected health information in a manner that would violate the requirements of this subpart if done by the covered entity, but we add two exceptions. First, we permit a covered entity to authorize a business associate to use and disclose protected health information it receives in its capacity as a business associate for its proper management and administration and to carry out its legal responsibilities. The contract must limit further disclosures of the protected health information for these purposes to those that are required by law and to those for which the business associate obtains reasonable assurances that the protected health information will be held confidentially and that it will be notified by the person to whom it discloses the protected health information of any breaches of confidentiality.

Second, we permit a covered entity to authorize the business associate to provide data aggregation services to the covered entity. As discussed above in § 164.501, data aggregation, with respect to protected health information received by a business associate in its capacity as the business associate of a covered entity, is the combining of such protected health information by the business associate with protected health information received by the business associate in its capacity as a business associate of another covered entity, to permit the creation of data for analyses that relate to the health care operations of the respective covered entities. We added this service to the business associate definition to clarify the ability of covered entities to contract with business associates to undertake quality assurance and comparative analyses that involve the protected health information of more than one contracting covered entity. We except data aggregation from the general requirement that a business associate contract may not authorize a business associate to use or further disclose protected health information in a manner that would violate the requirements of this subpart if done by the covered entity in order to permit the combining or aggregation of protected health information received in its capacity as a business associate of different covered entities when it is performing this service. In many cases, the combining of this information for the respective health care operations of the covered entities is not something that the covered entities could do - a covered entity cannot generally disclose protected health information to another covered entity for the disclosing covered entity's health care operations. However, we permit covered entities that enter into business associate contracts with a business associate for data aggregation to permit the business associate to combine or aggregate the protected health information they disclose to the business associate for their respective health care operations.

We note that there may be other instances in which a business associate may combine or aggregate protected health information received in its capacity as a business associate of different covered entities, such as when it is performing health care operations on behalf of covered entities that participate in an organized health care arrangement. A business associate that is performing payment functions on behalf of different covered entities also may combine protected health information when it is necessary, such as when the covered entities share financial risk or otherwise jointly bill for services.

In the final rule we clarify that the business associate contract must require the business associate to make available protected health information for amendment and to incorporate such amendments. The business associate contract must also require the business associate to make available the information required to provide an accounting of disclosures. We provide more flexibility to the requirement that all protected health information be returned by the business associate upon termination of the contract. The rule now stipulates that if feasible, the protected health information should be destroyed or returned at the end of a contract. Accordingly, a contract with a business associate must state that if there are reasons that the return or destruction of the information is not feasible and the information must be retained for specific reasons and uses, such as for future audits, privacy protections must continue after the contract ends, for as long as the business associate retains the information. The contract also must state that the uses of information after termination of the contract must be limited to the specific set of uses or disclosures that make it necessary for the business associate to retain the information.

We also remove the requirement that business associate contracts contain a provision stating that individuals whose protected health information is disclosed under the contract are intended third-party beneficiaries of the contract. Third party beneficiary or similar responsibilities may arise under these business associate arrangements by operation of state law; we do not intend in this rule to affect the operation of such state laws.

We modify the requirement that a business associate contract require the business associate to ensure that agents abide by the provisions of the business associate contract. We clarify that agents includes subcontractors, and we note that a business associate contract must make the business associate responsible for ensuring that any person to whom it delegates a function, activity or service which is within its business associate contract with the covered entity agrees to abide by the restrictions and conditions that apply to the business associate under the contract. We note that a business associate will need to consider the purpose for which protected health information is being disclosed in determining whether the recipient must be bound to the restrictions and conditions of the business associate contract. When the disclosure is a delegation of a function, activity or service that the business associate has agreed to perform for a covered entity, the recipient who undertakes such a function steps into the shoes of the business associate and must be bound to the restrictions and conditions. When the disclosure is to a third party who is not performing business associate functions, activities or services for on behalf of the covered entity, but is the type of disclosure that the covered entity itself could make without giving rise to a business associate relationship, the business associate is not required to ensure that the restrictions or conditions of the business associate contract are maintained.

For example, if a business associate acts as the billing agent of a health care provider, and discloses protected health information on behalf of the hospital to health plans, the business associate has no responsibility with respect to further uses or disclosures by the health plan. In the example above, where a covered entity has a business associate contract with a lawyer, and the lawyer discloses protected health information to an expert witness in preparation for litigation, the lawyer again would have no responsibility under this subpart with respect to uses or disclosures by the expert witness, because such witness is not undertaking the functions, activities or services that the business associate lawyer has agreed to perform. However, if a covered entity contracts with a third party administrator to provide claims management, and the administrator delegates management of the pharmacy benefits to a third party, the business associate third party administrator must ensure that the pharmacy manager abides by the restrictions and conditions in the business associate contract between the covered entity and the third party administrator.

We provide in § 164.504(c)(3) several methods other than a business associate contract that will satisfy the requirement for satisfactory assurances under this section. First, when a government agency is a business associate of another government agency that is a covered entity, we permit memorandum of understanding between the agencies to constitute satisfactory assurance for the purposes of this rule, if the memorandum accomplishes each of the objectives of the business associate contract. We recognize that the relationships of government agencies are often organized as a matter of law, and that it is not always feasible for one agency to contract with another for all of the purposes provided for in this section. We also recognize that it may be incorrect to view one government agency as 'acting on behalf of" the other government agency; under law, each agency may be acting to fulfill a statutory mission. We note that in some instances, it may not be possible for the agencies to include the right to terminate the arrangement because the relationship may be established under law. In such instances, the covered entity government agency would need to fulfill the requirement to report known violations of the memorandum to the Secretary.

Where the covered entity is a government agency, we consider the satisfactory assurances requirement to be satisfied if other law contains requirements applicable to the business associate that accomplish each of the objectives of the business associate contract. We recognize that in some cases, covered entities that are government agencies may be able to impose the requirements of this section directly on the persons acting as their business associates. We also recognize that often one government agency is acting as a business associate of another government agency, and either party may have the legal authority to establish the requirements of this section by regulation. We believe that imposing these requirements directly on business associates provides greater protection than we can otherwise provide under this section, and so we recognize such other laws as sufficient to substitute for a business associate contract.

We also recognize that there may be some circumstances where the relationship between covered entities and business associates is otherwise mandated by law. In the final rule, we provide that where a business associate is required by law to act as a business associate to a covered entity, the covered entity may disclose protected health information to the business associate to the extent necessary to comply with the legal mandate without meeting the requirement to have a business associate contract (or, in the case of government agencies, a memorandum of understanding or law pertaining to the business associate) if it makes a good faith attempt the obtain satisfactory assurances required by this section and, if unable to do so, documents the attempt and the reasons that such assurances cannot be obtained. This provision addresses situations where law requires one party to act as the business associate of another party. The fact that the parties have contractual obligations that may be enforceable is not sufficient to meet the required by law test in this provision.

This provision recognizes that in some instances the law requires that a government agency act as a business associate of a covered entity. For example, the United States Department of Justice is required by law to defend tort suits brought against certain covered entities; in such circumstances, however, the United States, and not the individual covered entity, is the client and is potentially liable. In such situations, covered entities must be able to disclose protected health information needed to carry out the representation, but the particular requirements that would otherwise apply to a business associate relationship may not be possible to obtain. Subsection (iii) makes clear that, where the relationship is required by law, the covered entity complies with the rule if it attempts, in good faith, to obtain satisfactory assurances as are required by this paragraph and, if such attempt fails, documents the attempts and the reasons that such assurances cannot be obtained.

The operation of the final rule maintains the construction discussed in the preamble to the NPRM that a business associate (including a business associate that is a covered entity) that has business associate contracts with more than one covered entity generally may not use or disclose the protected health information that it creates or receives in its capacity as a business associate of one covered entity for the purposes of carrying out its responsibilities as a business associate of another covered entity, unless doing so would be a lawful use or disclosure for each of the covered entities and the business associate's contract with each of the covered entities permits the business associate to undertake the activity. For example, a business associate performing a function under health care operations on behalf of an organized health care arrangement would be permitted to combine or aggregate the protected health information obtained from covered entities participating in the arrangement to the extent necessary to carry out the authorized activity and in conformance with its business associate contracts. As described above, a business associate providing data aggregation services to different covered entities also could combine and use the protected health information of the covered entities to assist with their respective health care operations. A covered entity that is undertaking payment activities on behalf of different covered entities also may use or disclose protected health information obtained as a business associate of one covered entity when undertaking such activities as a business associate of another covered entity where the covered entities have authorized the activities and where they are necessary to secure payment for the entities. For example, when a group of providers share financial risk and contract with a business associate to conduct payment activities on their behalf, the business associate may use the protected health information received from the covered entities to assist them in managing their shared risk arrangement.

Finally, we note that the requirements imposed by this provision are intended to extend privacy protection to situations in which a covered entity discloses substantial amounts of protected health information to other persons so that those persons can perform functions or activities on its behalf or deliver specified services to it. A business associate contract basically requires the business associate to maintain the confidentiality of the protected health information that it receives and generally to use and disclose such information for the purposes for which it was provided. This requirement does not interfere with the relationship between a covered entity and business associate, or require the business associate to subordinate its professional judgment to that of a covered entity. Covered entities may rely on the professional judgment of their business associates as to the type and amount of protected health information that is necessary to carry out a permitted activity. The requirements of this provision are aimed at securing the continued confidentiality of protected health information disclosed to third parties that are serving the covered entity's interests.