Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information. Final Privacy Rule Preamble.. Comments Regarding Proposed § 164.510(f)(3), Information About a Victim of Crime or Abuse

12/28/2000

Comment: Some law enforcement organizations expressed concern that proposed § 164.510(f)(3) could inhibit compliance with state mandatory reporting laws.

Response: We recognize that the NPRM could have preempted such state mandatory reporting laws, due to the combined impact of proposed §§ 164.510(m) and 164.510(f). As explained in detail in § 164.512(a) above, we did not intend that result, and we modify the final rule to make clear that this rule does not preempt state mandatory reporting laws.

Comment: Many commenters, including consumer and provider groups, expressed concern that allowing covered entities to disclose protected health information without authorization to law enforcement regarding victims of crime, abuse, and other harm could endanger victims, particularly victims of domestic violence, who could suffer further abuse if their abuser learned that the information had been reported. Provider groups also expressed concern about undermining provider-patient relationships. Some law enforcement representatives noted that in many cases, health care providers' voluntary reports of abuse or harm can be critical for the successful prosecution of violent crime. They argued, that by precluding providers from voluntarily reporting to law enforcement evidence of potential abuse, the proposed rule could make it more difficult to apprehend and prosecute criminals.

Response: We recognize the need for heightened sensitivity to the danger facing victims of crime in general, and victims of domestic abuse or neglect in particular. As discussed above, the final rule includes a new section (§ 164.512(c)) establishing strict conditions for disclosure of protected health information about victims of abuse, neglect, and domestic violence.

Victims of crime other than abuse, neglect, or domestic violence can also be placed in further danger by disclosure of protected health information relating to the crime. In § 164.512(f)(3) of the final rule, we establish conditions for disclosure of protected health information in these circumstances, and we make significant modifications to the proposed rule's provision for such disclosures. Under the final rule, unless a state or other government authority has enacted a law requiring disclosure of protected health information about a victim to law enforcement officials, in most instances, covered entities must obtain the victim's agreement before disclosing such information to law enforcement officials. This requirement gives victims control over decision making about their health information where their safety could be at issue, helps promote trust between patients and providers, and is consistent with health care providers' ethical obligation to seek patient authorization whenever possible before disclosing protected health information.

At the same time, the rule strikes a balance between protecting victims and providing law enforcement access to information about potential crimes that cause harm to individuals, by waiving the requirement for agreement in two situations. In allowing covered entities to disclose protected health information about a crime victim pursuant to a state or other mandatory reporting law, we defer to other governmental bodies' judgments on when certain public policy objectives are important enough to warrant mandatory disclosure of protected health information to law enforcement. While some mandatory reporting laws are written more broadly than others, we believe that it is neither appropriate nor practicable to distinguish in federal regulations between what we consider overly broad and sufficiently focused mandatory reporting laws.

The final rule waives the requirement for agreement if the covered entity is unable to obtain the individual's agreement due to incapacity or other emergency circumstance, and (1) the law enforcement official represents that the information is needed to determine whether a violation of law by a person other than the victim has occurred and the information is not intended to be used against the victim; (2) the law enforcement official represents that immediate law enforcement activity that depends on the disclosure would be materially and adversely affected by waiting until the individual is able to agree to the disclosure; and (3) the covered entity determines, in the exercise of professional judgment, that the disclosure is in the individual's best interests. By allowing covered entities, in the exercise of professional judgment, to determine whether such disclosures are in the individual's best interests, the final rule recognizes the importance of the provider-patient relationship.

In addition, the final rule allows covered entities to initiate disclosures of protected health information about victims without the victim's permission to law enforcement officials only if such disclosure is required under a state mandatory reporting law. In other circumstances, plans and providers may disclose protected health information only in response to a request from a law enforcement official. We believe that such an approach recognizes the importance of promoting trust between victims and their health care providers. If providers could initiate reports of victim information to law enforcement officials absent a legal reporting mandate, victims may avoid give their providers health information that could facilitate their treatment, or they may avoid seeking treatment completely.

Comment: Many commenters believed that access to medical records pursuant to this provision should occur only after judicial review. Others believed that it should occur only with patient consent or after notifying the patient of the disclosure to law enforcement. Similarly, some commenters said that the minimum necessary standard should apply to this provision, and they recommended restrictions on law enforcement agencies' re-use of the information.

Response: As discussed above, the final rule generally requires individual agreement as a condition for disclosure of a victim's health information; this requirement provides greater privacy protection and individual control than would a requirement for judicial review. We also discuss above the situations in which this requirement for agreement may be waived, and why that is appropriate. The requirement that covered entities disclose the minimum necessary protected health information consistent with the purpose of the disclosure applies to disclosures of protected health information about victims to law enforcement, unless the disclosure is required by law. (See § 164.514 for more detail on the requirements for minimum necessary use and disclosure of protected health information.) As described above, HIPAA does not provide statutory authority for HHS to regulate law enforcement agencies' re-use of protected health information that they obtain pursuant to this rule.

Comment: A few commenters expressed concern that the NPRM would not have required law enforcement agencies' requests for protected health information about victims to be in writing. They believed that written requests could promote clarity in law enforcement requests, as well as greater accountability among law enforcement officials seeking information.

Response: We do not impose this requirement in the final rule. We believe that such a requirement would not provide significant new protection for victims and would unduly impede the completion of legitimate law enforcement investigations.

Comment: A provider group was concerned that it would be difficult for covered entities to evaluate law enforcement officials' claims that information is needed and that law enforcement activity may be necessary. Some comments from providers and individuals expressed concern that the proposed rule would have provided open-ended access by law enforcement to victims' medical records because of this difficulty in evaluating law enforcement claims of their need for the information.

Response: We modify the NPRM in several ways that reduce covered entities' decisionmaking burdens. The final rule clarifies that covered entities may disclose protected health information about a victim of crime where a report is required by state or other law, and it requires the victim's agreement for disclosure in most other instances. The covered entity must make the decision whether to disclose only in limited circumstances: when there is no mandatory reporting law; or when the victim is unable to provide agreement and the law enforcement official represents that: the protected health information is needed to determine whether a violation of law by a person other than the victim has occurred, that the information will not be used against the victim, and that immediate law enforcement activity that depends on such information would be materially and adversely affected by waiting until the individual is able to agree to the disclosure. In these circumstances, we believe it is appropriate to rely on the covered entity, in the exercise of professional judgment, to determine whether the disclosure is in the individual's best interests. Other sections of this rule allow covered entities to reasonably rely on certain representations by law enforcement officials (see § 164.514, regarding verification,) and require disclosure of the minimum necessary protected health information for this purpose. Together, these provisions do not allow open-ended access or place undue responsibility on providers.