Research on Employment Supports for People with Disabilities: Summary of the Focus Group Findings. NOTES

09/01/2001

  1. Source: Federal Register (1999).

  2. Supports used in securing a first job refer to supports used during transition from school to work, or from disability onset to work.

  3. While expectations and motivation played a critical role in the employment success of those we interviewed, this does not mean, of course, that those who have not achieved a similar measure of employment success are not highly motivated. The most highly motivated individuals might be unable to overcome the barriers and disincentives to employment that are faced by many people with disabilities.

  4. Section 209(b) of the Social Security Amendments of 1972 allows states to determine Medicaid eligibility separately from SSI eligibility, using income and resource standards that are no more restrictive than those in effect in 1972. There are eleven 209(b) states (Connecticut, Hawaii, Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota, Missouri, New Hampshire, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, and Virginia).

  5. WIA replaces the Job Training Partnership Act (JTPA), passed in 1982, which authorized funding for programs to prepare youth (and adults) for entry into the labor force. Under JTPA, state programs were established and administered by Private Industry Councils comprising employers and education personnel. Services varied by state, but generally included job search, basic skills training, labor market information, occupational skills training, work experience, literacy training, job placement assistance, and summer youth employment.

  6. Source: Federal Register (1999).

  7. At each site, a number of individuals who were screened in as focus group participants but who could not attend a focus group were interviewed by phone.

  8. Supports used in securing a first job refer to supports used during transition from school to work, or from disability onset to work.

  9. It is possible that this interviewee confused Social Security survivor benefits with SSI.

  10. In determining SGA, "countable" monthly earnings (i.e., gross earnings minus any subsidized earnings and impairment-related work expenses) are averaged over the period of time in which work was performed.

  11. At the time this focus group was conducted, SGA was equivalent to $700 in monthly income. As of January 1, 2001, SGA has been increased to $740 a month.

  12. While expectations and motivation played a critical role in the employment success of those we interviewed, this does not mean, of course, that those who have not achieved a similar measure of employment success are not highly motivated. The most highly motivated individuals might be unable to overcome the barriers and disincentives to employment that are faced by many people with disabilities.