Report to the Congress on Kinship Foster Care. Preference for and Recruitment of Kin

06/01/2000

In placing children in foster care, all but two States reported in 1997 that they gave preference to kin over unrelated foster parents, and 30 States and the District of Columbia reported doing so for more than the past five years (Boots and Geen, 1999).18 However, it is unclear how States’ preference for kin is implemented. For example, there is no record of whether or how often States recruit kin to become foster parents or simply give preference to kin who come forward when a child is removed from his or her home. In 1997, 24 States reported that over the past three years they had tried to recruit kin to be foster parents; however, these States saw only a slight increase in the number of children placed in public kinship care, compared to States that did not try to recruit kin to become foster parents or simply give preference to kin who come forward when a child is removed from his or her home. In 1997, 24 states reported that over the past three years they had tried to recruit kin to become foster parents; however these States saw only a slight increase in the number of children placed in public kinship care, compared to states that did not try to recruit (Boots and Geen, 1998).

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