Report to the Congress on Kinship Foster Care. Conditions Under Which Children Enter Kinship CARE

06/01/2000

While both public kinship and non-kin foster parents care for children whom the state may need to protect, the circumstances leading to placement appear to be different. For example, children in public kinship care are more likely to have been removed from a parent’s home because of abuse or neglect, as opposed to parent-child conflict or a behavioral problem (Cook and Ciarico, 1998). Several small-scale studies have found that children in public kinship care are more likely to have been removed because of neglect (Gleeson et al., 1995; Grogan-Kaylor, 1996; Iglehart, 1994; Landsverk et al., 1996). Unlike non-kin foster children, many children in kinship care have lived with the relatives caring for them prior to the child welfare system’s involvement.

In comparing the birth parents (or prior caregivers) of children in foster care, it appears that children in public kinship care are more likely to come from homes in which the birth parents had a drug or alcohol problem (AFCARS, 1998; Altshuler, 1998; Beeman et al., 1996; Benedict et al., 1996; Cook and Ciarico, 1998; Gleeson et al., 1996; Gleeson et al., 1997). In addition, the birth parents of public kinship care children are more likely to be young (Cook and Ciarico, 1998) and never married than the birth parents of children in non-kin foster care (Altshuler, 1998; Cook and Ciarico, 1998).

View full report

Preview
Download

"full.pdf" (pdf, 680.86Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®