Profile of Families Cycling on and off Welfare: Research Brief. Findings

10/26/2004

Overall, cyclers constituted a relatively small portion of the welfare caseload. Only 9 percent of recipients became welfare cyclers during the four-year observation period. About 47 percent of sample members became short-term recipients and 45 percent became long-term recipients. Rates of cycling ranged from 3.8 percent of sample members (in Philadelphia) to 13.7 percent (in Florida FTP).

Cyclers generally fared better than long-term recipients, but not as well as short-term recipients. For example, 28 percent of cyclers worked during at least three-fourths of the quarters of observation, compared to 35 percent of short-term recipients and only 12 percent of long-term recipients.

Cyclers demonstrated a greater propensity to combine welfare and work than both short- and long-term recipients. For cyclers, quarters with both earnings and welfare receipt accounted for just over one-third of all quarters in the period, compared to only 26 percent and 14 percent for short-term and long-term recipients respectively, as shown in Table 1.

Table 1.
Percentage of Quarters Working and Receiving Welfare During Years 1-4 After Sample Intake

Percentage of Quarters Working and Receiving Welfare During Years 1-4 After Sample Intake.

Source:  MDRC Evaluation data from Connecticut Jobs First,
Florida Family Transition Program (FTP) and Vermont Work Restructuring Project (WRP), and
MDRC Urban Change data from Cleveland and Philadelphia.

Note:  Short-term recipients had 1-2 welfare spells for a total of up to 24 months of receipt,
long-term recipients had 1-2 welfare spells for a total of 25 to 48 months, and
cyclers had a total of 3 welfare spells during the 4-year period.

The report also found that the incidence of cycling increased during the years following PRWORA. In Cleveland and Philadelphia, the sites with the longest sample intake periods, rates of cycling were about 3 percentage points higher among welfare recipients who entered the research sample following passage of PRWORA, when compared with welfare recipients who entered the research sample previous to its passage. Furthermore, cyclers constituted a larger portion of the welfare caseload by end of the 1990s than earlier in the decade.

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