Personal Privacy in an Information Society. End Notes

07/12/1997

1 For a discussion of the fair hearing procedures, see Chapter 11.

2Bank Secrecy Act, 12 U.S.C. 1829b, 1953; 12 C.F.R. §103.36.

3 California Bankers Association v. Schultz, 416 U.S. 21 (1975).

4State ex rel. Tarver v. Smith 78 Wash. 2d 152, 470 P.2d 172, cert. denied, 402 U.S. 1001 (1971); United States v. Miller, 425 U.S. 435 (1976).

5See Chapter 4.

6 For an analysis of the Privacy Act principles, see Chapter 13.

7 U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare, Secretary's Advisory Committee on Automated Personal Data Systems, Records, Computers, and the Rights of Citizens (Washington, D.C.:1973), p.41. The five fair information principles were: (1) there must be no personal-data record-keeping systems whose very existence is secret; (2) there must be a way for an individual to find out what information about him is in a record and how it is used; (3) there must be a way for an individual to prevent information about him obtained for one purpose from being used or made available for other purposes without his consent; (4) there must be a way for an individual to correct or amend a record of identifiable information about him; and (5) any organization creating, maintaining, using, or disseminating records of identifiable personal data must assure the reliability of the data for their intended use and must take reasonable precautions to prevent misuse of the data.

8 See, e.g., Stanley v. Georgia, 394 U.S. 557 (1969); Kliendieast v. Mandel, 408 U.S. 753 (1972); Cox Broadcasting Corp. v. Cohn, 420 U.S. 469 (1975).

9 391 U.S. 301 (1965).

10 Thomas I. Emerson, The System of Freedom of Expression (New York: Vintage, 1970), p. 414.

11425 U.S. 748 (1976).

12413 U.S. 376 (1973).

13 5 U.S.C. 552.

14National League of Cities v. Usery, 426 U.S. 833 (1976).

15 12 C.F.R. §226.

1615 U.S.C. 1681 et seq.

1715 U.S.C. 1012.

18 See Chapter 13.