Performance Improvement 2010. Care for Adopted Children

01/01/2010

Using responses to the 2005-2006 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs, a study explored how the special health care needs of adopted children compare to those of the general population.  Adopted children with special health care needs are less likely to have physical health conditions or body function difficulties than are other children with special health care needs, but are more likely to have mental health conditions, activity/participation and emotional/behavioral functional difficulties.  They are more likely to have most of the special health care needs assessed in the survey's screener and more likely to need a variety of health care and family support services, relative to all children with special health care needs.  They also have a number of advantages in terms of their families' ability to meet these challenges.  They are more likely to be insured, to have consistent and adequate insurance coverage, and to live in households with higher income and education.  In addition, although their families pay more out of pocket for their health care, they do not appear to suffer greater financial difficulties as a result.  (9198

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