Family Preservation and Family Support (FP/FS) Services Implementation Study

The 1993 Family Preservation and Family Support (FP/FS) legislation authorized nearly $1 billion over five years in new Federal funding for services to strengthen and support families' efforts to provide a safe and nurturing environment for their children. FP/FS funds were to be administered at the Federal level by the Administration on Children, Youth and Families and at the State level by the child welfare agency responsible for administering child welfare services funds. The purpose of this study is to evaluate how States and communities implemented the legislation, the ways in which implementation altered the pre-existing service delivery system, and the effects on service delivery. The report is based on: (1) a review of the FP/FS applications, State plans and 1996 plan updates submitted by each of the 50 States; (2) site visits to 10 States conducted between November 1995 and July 1996; and (3) site visits to 20 communities between September 1996 and June 1997. (two volumes)

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

FEDERAL CONTACT: Jagannathan, Dr. K.A.
202-205-4829

PIC ID: 5975

PERFORMER: James Bell Associates, Inc.
Arlington, VA

Project REFRESH: Research and Evaluation of Foster Children's Reception into Environmentally Supportive Homes

Little is known about everyday occurrences in foster family homes. Assessment tools and evaluation protocols are needed to examine factors affecting quality and satisfaction with care in kinship/non-kinship placements. Project REFRESH, a three- year study, identified factors affecting quality of care and children's integration into kinship/non-kinship foster settings. Objectives were to: (1) evaluate quality of care, (2) evaluate participants' satisfaction with care, (3) assess perceived quality and quantity of caregiver training, (4) test an integration model, (5) develop an assessment tool and evaluation protocol, and (6) disseminate project results. This case study design assessed children's integration processes and juxtaposed integration and quality, and satisfaction with care, in kinship/non-kinship settings. Variables examined during family interviews were: (1) status, (2) time, (3) space, (4) resources and (5) language. Members and associated caseworkers of 60 kinship/non-kinship families served as data sources in family interaction assessment. A subsample of 10 families/caseworkers participated in a qualitative component. Data collection methods included (1) interviews, (2) questionnaires, (3) observations, (4) children's drawings, (5) rating scales and (6) videotaped family interaction sessions. Based on the findings, an assessment tool and evaluation protocol were developed and tested to aid in placement decisions. An immediate benefit is a richer understanding of kinship and non-kinship foster placements. The ultimate benefit is the creation of frameworks within which to assess the quality of services to foster children.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Administration on Children, Youth and Families

FEDERAL CONTACT: Wave-Rice, Geneva
202-205-8654

PIC ID: 6851

PERFORMER: University of Oregon, Family Studies Center
Corvallis, OR

Strengthening Homeless Families: A Coalition-Building Guide

The purpose of this Coalition-Building Guide is to assist shelters and community-based agencies to plan, develop and implement collaborative services designed to strengthen homeless families and create systematic change within the community. The Guide is intended to serve as a self-guided planning tool. The worksheets contained throughout the document may be used individually by shelters and community-based agencies to examine respective issues, resources, or plans, or they may be used collectively by a coalition of agencies seeking to enhance their collaborative efforts. The planning process described in this Guide is designed to support collaborative partnerships among the traditional and non-traditional allies of shelters. Such agencies include medical and mental health agencies, housing authorities, child and family services agencies, churches, schools, private businesses, philanthropic organizations, law enforcement and advocacy organizations. Chapter one provides a brief overview of the multiple needs of homeless families and children and frames the rationale for a comprehensive, collaborative, community-based approach to strengthening homeless families and child abuse prevention efforts. Chapter two discusses the strategic planning process--the conceptual framework for coalition building. Chapter three is a step-by-step implementation guide to collaboration among shelters and traditional and non-traditional allies within the community. Finally, the Appendix contains support materials and suggested additional reading. (See PIC ID 5040)

AGENCY SPONSOR: Administration on Children, Youth and Families

FEDERAL CONTACT: Gaffney, Joan
202-205-8910

PIC ID: 5040.1

PERFORMER: Circle, Inc.
McLean, VA

Strengthening Homeless Families: An Annotated Resource Guide

This Annotated Resource Guide is one of two documents to assist shelter staff to enhance their understanding of child abuse and neglect; to create temporary housing environments that support and strengthen families; and to build collaborative, community-based approaches to preventing child abuse and neglect. The Guide provides an overview of the multiple needs of homeless families and children and contains brief descriptions of programs (currently being implemented by shelters) to strengthen families. The Guide is organized into four chapters. Chapter one presents a brief overview of homelessness in the U.S., including a discussion of the risk of child abuse and neglect among homeless families. This chapter also outlines the purpose and organization of the Guide. Chapter two provides an overview of the signs and symptoms of child abuse and neglect as well as reporting requirements when abuse or neglect is suspected. Chapter three delineates the complex needs of families and children and briefly describes a variety of programs which have been implemented to address these needs. Chapter four discusses the importance of collaborative, community-based service delivery for families and children. This chapter serves as an introduction to the companion document Strengthening Families: A Coalition-Building Guide. (See PIC ID 5040.1)

AGENCY SPONSOR: Administration on Children, Youth and Families

FEDERAL CONTACT: Gaffney, Joan
202-205-8910

PIC ID: 5040

PERFORMER: Circle, Inc.
McLean, VA