Performance Improvement 1999. Human Services Policy

02/01/1999

TITLE: Mandatory Review and Modification in TANF Cases

ABSTRACT: The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 made the review and modification of child support awards for those receiving welfare assistance optional, a change from prior law which required such reviews every three years. Given that States now have a policy choice, this project seeks to inform that choice by developing national estimates of the financial impacts of not reviewing child support awards for welfare recipient families on State child support collections. This project seeks to provide estimates of the financial impacts to the Federal and State governments (how such a discontinuance would impact child support offsets to cash assistance payments.) The financial impacts on families are to be estimated, paying particular attention to those who have left the welfare rolls.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Don Oellerich

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5877

PIC ID: 6749

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Institute for Research on Poverty, Madison WI

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 11/10/98
 

TITLE: Child Health and Development Programs in the Context of Welfare Reform

ABSTRACT: This project will identify and present profiles of promising Federal, State and/or community-based health and human services programs believed to be enhancing the health and development of children in the context of welfare reform. Targeted activities include case management strategies, child assessment programs, links between pre-kindergarten and child care programs, school-readiness programs and the use of formal child care versus informal child care arrangements.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Martha Moorehouse

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-6939

PIC ID: 6754

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Plainsboro, NJ

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 06/30/99
 

TITLE: Diagnosed Health Conditions and Health Care Service Utilization of Children in Foster Care

ABSTRACT: This project will conduct a study of health care issues regarding children in foster care. The study will use State Medicaid Research Files (SMRF) for three States to examine the extent of diagnosed illness and disability among children in foster care and the receipt of health care by these children. SMRF data includes information on health care claims made through the Medicaid program as well as information regarding the diagnoses associated with those claims. The study will examine questions regarding: (1) the extent of diagnosed illness and disability among children in foster care as compared to other children on Medicaid; (2) receipt of health care services including acute care, care for chronic health conditions and preventive services; (3) receipt of health care services following transitions into and out of foster care; and (4) subgroups of children in foster care, such as adolescents' use of substance abuse treatment and/or pregnancy-related services.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Laura Feig

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5938

PIC ID: 7149

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Washington, DC

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 2/20/99
 

TITLE: Domestic Violence and Welfare: An Early Assessment

ABSTRACT: This project will study early implementation of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) Family Violence Option and child support enforcement program responses, including the use of good cause waivers for battered women. Evidence suggests that some battered women seek employment and child support while others need specialized assistance in addressing partner abuse. To address domestic violence, States may have policies regarding screening and other forms of identification, assessment of a battered woman's needs, service provision, confidentiality, corroboration required, staffing arrangements, agreements with community resources and other considerations. The study will provide information about these policy issues, the status of program implementation and descriptions of useful models.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Gerald Silverman

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5654

PIC ID: 6724

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Urban Institute Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/1/00
 

TITLE: Wisconsin Data Project on Former AFDC Recipients

ABSTRACT: This project will provide early results on the economic and employment outcomes of women who leave the Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) rolls in Wisconsin, a State that has experienced a rapid decline in caseloads over the past ten years. While no data are available on women who leave the rolls under Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), this project will examine women as they make the transition from welfare to work in a State that began many TANF-like welfare reforms before the passage of Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunities Restoration Act (PRWORA). The analysis will be conducted using linked administrative data from the State of Wisconsin including: (1) AFDC data, Food Stamps data and Medicaid data from the Client Assistance for Re-Employment and Economic Support administrative database (CARES); (2) earnings data from the Unemployment Insurance records database (UI); and (3) income and family status data from the State tax record database. This project will not explain caseload decline; rather, it will describe the characteristics and outcomes of two groups of women who have left the AFDC program in Wisconsin. The first group will be composed of recipients who left AFDC during 1995, and the second group will be composed of recipients who left AFDC in 1990. The project will include: (1) a descriptive analysis of those who left the rolls, (2) a descriptive comparison of the economic status of women before and after leaving welfare, and (3) a detailed comparison of both the characteristics and outcomes of those who left AFDC in 1995 and 1990.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Susan Hauan

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-8698

PIC ID: 6727

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Institute for Research on Poverty, Madison WI

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 1/1/99
 

TITLE: Welfare Reform and Changing Program Participation Patterns in Four States

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to understand how families' use of a variety of safety net programs changes over time as welfare reform is implemented. This will be an early look at how welfare waivers and the welfare reform law influenced families' program participation. Using administrative data in four States from 1994-1997, the study will examine a series of questions regarding whether families' program participation patterns change in response to program eligibility changes and policy shifts. It will examine the child and family outcomes in such areas as family self sufficiency, child living arrangements and child abuse and neglect reports. The study's unique contribution will be its effort to look at families' pathways across a series of safety net programs.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Laura Feig

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5938

PIC ID: 7148

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Chapin Hall Center for Children, University of Chicago, IL

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/20/99
 

TITLE: Fixing to Change: The Role of One-Stop Job Centers Working with Welfare Recipients

ABSTRACT: One-stop job centers have become an important part of the welfare-to-work effort. These one-stop centers can take on many forms and provide a variety of services. This project looks at implementation issues for one-stop job centers serving welfare recipients. The study focuses on five cities, describing the range of program models used in the cities, and identifying those approaches that seem to be working well, as well as those issues posing challenges to one-stop centers. The study incorporates background information supplied by the one-stop centers, summary data on employer and welfare recipient characteristics, staffing information and responses from focus groups conducted among one-stop officials, one-stop staff, current recipients, previous recipients and employers.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Kelleen Kaye

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6634

PIC ID: 7152

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: University of Washington, Fiscal Policy Center Seattle, WA

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/20/99
 

TITLE: Paper Series on the Low Wage Labor Market

ABSTRACT: While research exists regarding the low-wage labor market, it is often not in a format that is useful to policymakers at the State and local levels. It is difficult and time-consuming to review the extensive volume of research papers that have been published in numerous sources. Furthermore, much of the research on the low-wage labor market is written from an academic perspective, focusing on statistical findings but not interpreting these findings in terms of policy implications. This project will synthesize important findings on major topics related to the low-wage labor market.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Kelleen Kaye

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6634

PIC ID: 6717

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Urban Institute Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 8/31/99
 

TITLE: Adolescent Decision Making Workshop

ABSTRACT: Efforts to reduce teen marijuana use, smoking and pregnancy are not new, but they are now being debated in a policy climate characterized by frustration at past attempts to address teen behavior and renewed efforts to take strong actions to reduce these behaviors. The role of decision making processes in these interventions is a topic that has generated a substantial core of new research. This project will convene a January workshop and prepare a summary report to: 1)identify the major lessons learned from the last decade of research on adolescent decision making, particularly as they bear on efforts to reduce behavior among adolescents; 2)discuss the results of research on efforts to intervene in adolescent behaviors; and 3)discuss the implications of this research for alternative approaches to reducing behavior among the Nation's youth, particularly in the areas of substance abuse and sexuality.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Elisa Koff

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5932

PIC ID: 6877

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: National Academy of Sciences, Board on Children and Families Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/31/99
 

TITLE: Labor Market Conditions, Job Search Strategies, and Welfare-to-Work Transitions

ABSTRACT: This study examines the effects of local low wage market conditions on the duration of welfare enrollment periods. While various studies have looked at the impact of employment conditions on welfare duration, employment conditions have often been measured using State-level indicators and/or indicators for the labor market as a whole. This study collects detailed information on the local labor market conditions for low-skilled workers and estimate the impact of such conditions, thus providing a more accurate picture of how labor market opportunities affect a recipient's ability to leave the welfare roles.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Kelleen Kaye

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6634

PIC ID: 6892

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, School of Public Health, Chapel Hill, NC

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/31/99
 

TITLE: Pregnancy Prevention Programs Targeting Boys and Young Men: Policy Information Dissemination Strategy

ABSTRACT: This project will develop a research and policy information strategy to inform regional, State, and local policy officials and community-based organizations serving children and youth of the program models, primarily directed at boys and young men, that can be implemented to help teenagers avoid premature sexual activity and unintended pregnancies. Project staff will: (1) review activities within the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and outside the Federal government to collect information about pregnancy prevention activities targeted at boys and young men; (2) meet with national, State, and community leaders to determine information needs; (3) develop information packets; and (4) test strategies to get information to State and community decision makers in a timely and usable format. This project is an integral part of the National Strategy to Prevent Teen Pregnancy and the Clinton Administration's Fatherhood Initiative, which promotes delaying fatherhood until a man is emotionally and financially ready, and encourages fathers to take a more active role in providing support and guidance to their children. It is also being undertaken in collaboration with the activities of the non-profit, non-partisan National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Linda Mellgren

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-6806

PIC ID: 6766

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Urban Institute Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 4/1/99
 

TITLE: Home Visitor Services Demonstration: Home Visiting for Teen Parents Required to Participate in JOBS

ABSTRACT: This demonstration tests the effectiveness of combining the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) program with weekly home visiting services provided by paraprofessionals to teen parents. The teens participating will be welfare recipients who are required to participate in education, training and employment-related activities through the JOBS program, including participation with the home visiting component. They will be first-time teen parents on public assistance and, based on past research, about one-half will be living on their own. The controlled experimental design evaluates whether the home visitors help participants increase participation in JOBS activities, improve parenting, experience fewer repeat pregnancies and births and increase use of preventive health care. A main focus of this project is obtaining appropriate health care, including preventive care, for teen parents and their children. Health outcomes such as immunizations for children will be measured.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Audrey Mirsky-Ashby

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6640

PIC ID: 6160

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 4/30/99
 

TITLE: Making Ends Meet: How Mothers Manage When Their Welfare Grants Are Cut

ABSTRACT: This study will describe how family life adjusts to sanctions, through collection of in-depth qualitative data from mothers who are currently experiencing a cut in their welfare budget due to an imposed sanction. The data will include details on: (1) changes in financial resources, (2) how family members are affected, (3) where families turn for additional support, (4) additional reported and unreported employment activity, (5) mothers' perceptions about conflicts between work and family responsibilities, and (6) perceptions about the availability of affordable child care.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Kelleen Kaye

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6634

PIC ID: 6893

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Teachers College Columbia University, New York, NY

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 8/1/99
 

TITLE: National Evaluation of Welfare-to-work Strategies

ABSTRACT: The Department of Health and Human Services is undertaking a study of the effectiveness of welfare-to-work programs. As part of the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies, the effects of two approaches to preparing welfare recipients for employment will be compared in three sites (Atlanta, Grand Rapids, and Riverside). In one approach, the human capital development approach, individuals are directed to avail themselves of education services and, to a lesser extent, occupational training before they seek work, under the theory that they will then be able to get better jobs and keep them longer. In the other approach, the labor force attachment approach, individuals are encouraged to gain quick entry into the labor market, even at low wages, under the theory that their work habits and skills will improve on the job and they will thereby be able to advance themselves. Note that the study does not focus on the effects of postsecondary education.

The evaluation uses a random assignment design in order to get reliable results. Sample members are being followed for five years from the time they entered the study. Comprehensive data on economic outcomes, including information on quarterly Unemployment Insurance-reported earnings and monthly TANF and Food Stamp payments is being collected. A broad range of data is being collected through surveys including data on educational attainment, family composition, housing status, wage progression, employment, child care, depression, and total family income. In addition, effects on the well-being of the children of the mothers in the study is being evaluated. Four types of child outcomes are being measured: cognitive development and academic achievement; safety and health; problem behavior and emotional well-being; and social development. Assessments in each of these area will be compared across research groups two and five years after the mothers entered the study sample.

The study is being conducted by the Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation. The project period is 1989-2000.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Audrey Mirsky-Ashby

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6640

PIC ID: 6576

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Manpower Demonstration Research Corporation, New York, NY

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 6/30/00
 

TITLE: Child Outcome Study of the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-work Strategies: Two-Year Impacts

ABSTRACT: The Child Outcomes Study is a substudy of the National Evaluation of Welfare-to-Work Strategies (NEWWS), a longitudinal evaluation of a set of welfare-to-work strategies implemented under the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills Training (JOBS) Program as a part of the 1988 Family Support Act. In the three sites selected for the Child Outcomes Study--Atlanta, GA; Grand Rapids, MI; and Riverside, CA--the evaluation is examining the impacts of two types of welfare-to-work approaches. The "labor force attachment (LFA) approach" encourages a rapid transition into the labor force, whereas the "human capital development (HCD) approach" follows a long-term strategy of investing in recipients' basic education, with the aim of increasing qualifications for higher wage jobs. The Child Outcomes Study seeks to evaluate the impacts of each strategy on children's development and behavior in three domains: (1) cognitive development and academic achievement, (2) behavioral and emotional adjustment, and (3) physical health and safety. It will examine which maternal, family, and contextual characteristics help to explain these impacts on children. Background information is included on such topics as: (1) mothers' educational attainment, (2) current and previous employment, (3) welfare history, (4) household composition, (5) psychological well-being, and (6) welfare-related attitudes. This and other information (e.g., parenting, child care, father involvement) was collected at two and five years after random assignment from administrative records and in-home surveys. In addition, the five-year follow-up will survey teachers about children's school progress and behavior.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Audrey Mirsky-Ashby

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6640

PIC ID: 6576.4
 

TITLE: The Role of Intermediaries in Welfare to Work

ABSTRACT: Moving millions of welfare recipients into the workforce is the cornerstone of the recently enacted welfare reform legislation, the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996. Efforts to employ welfare recipients under PRWORA will not be successful without the involvement and support of private sector employers. Across the country, businesses are getting involved to varying degrees in welfare-to-work, including more than 2,500 member companies of the Welfare to Work Partnership who have pledged their commitment to hire welfare recipients. Many of these businesses are in turn relying on intermediaries to help them hire welfare recipients. The role of intermediaries varies significantly, from providing referrals or assistance with filing for tax credits, to providing extensive pre and post-employment services. While the importance of intermediaries is growing rapidly, little is known about them. This study provides two types of information on intermediaries. The first is a broad description of the types of intermediaries currently participating in welfare-to-work efforts in several sites across the country. This information will be presented for a large number of intermediaries, but will be fairly general, focusing on the basic characteristics of the intermediaries and the types of services provided. The second part of the project will present in-depth information on implementation issues based on site visits to the communities of approximately ten of these intermediaries.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Kelleen Kaye

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6634

PIC ID: 7151

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. Washington, DC

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 10/20/99
 

TITLE: Integration of Welfare and Workforce Development Systems

ABSTRACT: This study will: (1) build on research which examined State-level coordination and integration, and (2) provide an examination, using a case study approach, of the ways in which welfare agencies are working with other organizations involved in workforce development at the local level. It will provide additional insights into possible implications of various approaches to integration for individuals who are receiving public cash assistance through the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program, and who must seek employment and move toward economic self-sufficiency in a time-limited welfare environment. In addition to providing current information for policymakers and program administrators regarding the challenges to coordination and integration and lessons learned by local officials, the study will help to identify issue areas requiring in-depth study.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Audrey Mirsky-Ashby

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6640

PIC ID: 7144

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Urban Institute Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 8/31/99
 

TITLE: Disaggregating the TANF Child-Only Caseload in Three States

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study is to give the Department of Health and Human Services more detailed information about the make-up and trends of the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) child-only population three States. Child-only cases are those in which benefits are paid only on behalf of minor children, and there are no adults in the household receiving assistance. In some cases the children are living with adults other than their parents. In such a case, the caretaker receives assistance on behalf of the child, but not for himself/herself. In other cases, a parent is in the household but is ineligible for benefits for one of several reasons, including: (1) receipt of SSI, (2) unqualified alien status, or (3) imposed sanctions. Such cases currently make up 21 percent of the TANF caseload, a proportion which has grown significantly in recent years. This study will use administrative data, case file reviews, and interviews with program and policy staff in three States to provide a better understanding of the issues regarding child-only TANF cases.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Laura Feig

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5938

PIC ID: 7188

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: The Lewin Group Fairfax, VA

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 12/20/99
 

TITLE: Review of Family Preservation and Family Reunification Programs

ABSTRACT: This mandated evaluation attempts to document the impacts of a variety of family preservation programs on children and families. For the purposes of this evaluation, family preservation programs include: (1) placement prevention services aimed at preventing children from entering substitute care; (2) broader family preservation services that may be less intensive and of longer duration than placement prevention services; and (3) reunification services to speed the return of children to their homes after entering substitute care. Measures of program success include: (1) prevention of placement into substitute care (for pre-placement services), (2) successful reunification (for reunification services), (3) reduction of the recurrence of child abuse and neglect, (4) improved child psychological well-being, (5) improved child behavior, and (6) improved family functioning. A rigorous random assignment design is being used to assess differences between families who receive family preservation services and those who do not. The study examines five sites with existing family preservation and reunification programs: Louisville and Lexington, Kentucky; Memphis, Tennessee; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; New York City, New York; and eight counties in New Jersey. Field work is underway in all five sites. See PIC ID 5337 and 5337.1.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Matthew Stagner

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-5653

PIC ID: 5337.2

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Westat, Inc. Rockville, MD

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 12/31/99
 

TITLE: Economic and Health Status of Immigrants, Their Communities, and the Organizations that Serve Them

ABSTRACT: This project will conduct research on the economic and health status of immigrants, their communities and the organizations serving them. The research will profile the status of immigrants with regard to health, employment and participation in programs administered by public and private agencies, with special attention to distinguishing categories of immigrants and drawing comparisons with the Native population. The project will also explore the impacts of welfare reform on immigrants and organizations, with special attention to both individual and institutional adaptations. Since the loss of food stamps appears to be the most far-reaching and permanent change affecting current legal immigrants, its impact on immigrants and their families will be a particular focus of the study. The project will supplement an examination of existing secondary data with intensive secondary data collection in Los Angeles and New York, the two cities that together account for one-fourth of the immigrant population. Primary data collection in the two cities has been designed to develop profiles of immigrants in these cities and the agencies serving them. This effort has several components, including: (1) interviews with 1,200 immigrant households in each city; (2) telephone interviews with most of the non-profit agencies providing services to immigrants; (3) in-depth interviews with 100 immigrants who lose Food Stamps and with additional immigrants who retain food stamps in each city; and (4) in-depth interviews with administrators and staff in public and private agencies.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: David Nielson

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6642

PIC ID: 6747

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Urban Institute Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 10/1/00
 

TITLE: Welfare Outcomes Panel Study

ABSTRACT: The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (OASPE) is conducting a panel study with the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to evaluate the design of current, proposed and future studies of the effects of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA) of 1996. This panel study will assist the department in: (1) reviewing existing research efforts on the effects of welfare reform; (2) examine the appropriate data sources, research designs and statistical methods for analyzing welfare reform outcomes; and (3) identify research gaps and data needs for the continued study of welfare reform. Specific topics to be covered by the panel of experts include: (1) the appropriate outcome measures needed to effectively evaluate the outcomes of welfare reform; (2) the appropriate population of study; (3) the design and usefulness of existing national-level surveys (e.g., the Survey of Program Dynamics and the Survey of Income and Program Participation); (4) data needs for monitoring State and sub-State variation in outcomes; (5) potential uses and limitations of administrative data; and (6) integration of survey and administrative data. Over the course of the study, the NAS expert panel will address the above mentioned tasks through workshops, quarterly panel meetings and the publication of both an interim report and a final report. The interim report will include early recommendations of the panel and the final report will document the comprehensive list of final recommendations to the department.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Susan Hauan

PHONE NUMBER: 202-690-8698

PIC ID: 7145

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: National Academy of Sciences Washington, D.C.

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 3/2/01
 

TITLE: The National Evaluation of the Welfare to Work Grants Program

ABSTRACT: The Balanced Budget Act of 1997 authorized the Department of Labor to award $3 billion in welfare-to-work grants to States and local communities to promote job opportunities and employment preparation for the hardest-to-employ recipients of Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF), and for non-custodial parents of children on TANF. This project will evaluate the effectiveness of welfare-to-work initiatives, including those undertaken by the welfare-to-work grantees and by American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) tribal organizations. The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), in conjunction with the Departments of Labor and Housing and Urban Development, has designed an evaluation to address five key questions: (1) What are the types and packages of services provided by welfare-to-work grantees? (2) What are the net impacts of various welfare-to-work program approaches on employment and on family well-being? (3) What challenges are confronted as grantees implement and operate the programs? (4) Do the benefits of the programs outweigh the costs? and (5) How well do private industry councils and other non-TANF organizations meet the challenges of implementing the programs for the hard to employ? The evaluation study includes four main components: (1) a descriptive assessment of all welfare-to-work grantees based on mail surveys and site visits; (2) in-depth impact and cost-effectiveness study; (3) in-depth process and implementation study; and (4) a special process and implementation study focusing on tribal welfare and employment systems.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Human Services Policy

FEDERAL CONTACT: Alana Landey

PHONE NUMBER: 202-401-6636

PIC ID: 7147

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., Princeton, NJ

PROJECTED DATE OF COMPLETION: 10/03/02