Performance Improvement 1996. Administration on Aging

02/01/1996

Contents

Quality of Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings: Defining the Issues

Real People, Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act

TITLE: Quality of Long-Term Care in Home and Community-Based Settings: Defining the Issues

ABSTRACT NUMBER: 023

ABSTRACT: This study is the first step in implementing the 1992 amendments to the Older Americans Act, which authorize the Department of Health and Human Services to conduct two studies. The first study is on the quality of care provided by board and care (B & C) facilities, while the second study is on home care services for older and disabled individuals. The study listed here developed the conceptual framework and provisional design for the two mandated studies.

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Program Operations and Development

FEDERAL CONTACT: James Steen

Room 4262, Cohen Building

PHONE NUMBER: 202/619-0075

PIC ID: 5962

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC

TITLE: Real People, Real Problems: An Evaluation of the Long-Term Care Ombudsman Programs of the Older Americans Act

ABSTRACT NUMBER: 024

ABSTRACT: The long-term care ombudsmen program, administered by AoA, provides ombudsmen who advocate to protect the health, safety, welfare, and rights of the institutionalized elderly in nursing facilities and board and care homes. This report examines (1) State compliance with program mandates; (2) conflicts of interest; (3) effectiveness of the program; and (4) adequacy of resources for the program. The report finds that (1) the ombudsman program as a whole has not been fully implemented with regard to the provisions of the Older Americans Act; (2) not all residents of long-term care facilities have meaningful access to ombudsmen, and many are not aware of the program's existence; (3) ombudsmen provide timely responses to complaints; (4) implementation of the ombudsman program for residents of nursing facilities is uneven, and for residents of B&C homes it has not been implemented in any meaningful way; (5) because the ombudsman program is part of State government and its hierarchy, conflicts of interest and loyalty exist within the program, yet regulations do not reflect this reality; and (6) the ombudsman programs function well in many States, serving many thousands of institutionalized elderly, despite the obstacles of inadequate funding, staff shortages, low salary levels, and conflicts of interest. The report recommends improvements in each of the main areas it discusses. (Final report 248 pages, plus appendixes.)

AGENCY SPONSOR: Office of Program Operations and Development

FEDERAL CONTACT: Nancy Wartow

PHONE NUMBER: 202/619-1058

PIC ID: 5819

PERFORMER ORGANIZATION: National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC