Pathway to the Future: How Workforce Development and Quality Jobs Can Promote Quality Care Conference Package. Recruiting and Retaining a Quality Paraprofessional Workforce: Building Collaboratives with the Workforce Investment System

05/01/2004

Michael Fishman, M.Pysc., M.P.A., The Lewin Group
Burt Barnow, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University

MOTIVATION FOR PAPER

  • Shortage of long-term care paraprofessional workers exists
  • Increasing the supply of these workers can benefit the community and the workers
  • Long-term care sector is large and growing rapidly
  • Increased collaboration between long-term care sector and workforce investment can solve labor shortage problems and benefit both systems

PRESENTATION STRUCTURE

  • Describe briefly:
    • Long-term care paraprofessional workforce
    • Growth in long-term care sector
  • Reasons for workforce shortages
  • Overview of the workforce investment system
  • Long-term care sector response to shortages
  • Examples of workforce investment initiatives
  • Opportunities for collaboration

CHARACTERISTICS OF LONG-TERM CARE PARAPROFESSIONAL WORKFORCE

  • Currently over 2.5 million employed in variety of roles and settings
  • More likely than overall workforce to be:
    • Female
    • African-American
    • Less educated
    • Unmarried parents
    • Poor
    • Uninsured
  • Wages are low compared to other short-term training occupations
    • Lowest for home health aides and personal and home care aides
  • Better benefits if:
    • Employed full time
    • Work in hospital or nursing home
  • Many work part-time

GROWTH IN LONG-TERM CARE SECTOR

  • Need for long-term care predicted to increase 110 percent between 2000 and 2050
    • From 13 million to 27 million individuals
  • Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL) predicts large increase in paraprofessional occupations between 2002 and 2012
    • 48 percent for home health aides
    • 40 percent for personal and home care aides
    • 25 percent for nursing assistants
  • Outpaces predicted increase for all short-term training occupations (14%)
  • Growth in demand for paraprofessional workers compounded by high turnover rates

WORKFORCE SHORTAGES

  • What is a shortage?
    • A sustained market disequilibrium between supply and demand
  • Studies indicate a current shortage in long-term care paraprofessional occupations
  • Employers in long-term care sector often lack flexibility to address shortages due to government and third party reimbursement rates

OVERVIEW OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT SYSTEM

  • 1998 Workforce Investment Act created more demand-driven workforce investment system
  • Workforce Investment Board (WIB), comprised of business leaders and other stakeholders, plays major role in determining local services
  • One-Stop Career Centers provide three levels of services: core, intensive, and training
  • Core services are available to all, but if funds are limited intensive services and training reserved for low-income customers

TRAINING UNDER WIA

  • Most training is done through individual training accounts (ITAs) that are like vouchers
  • State and local WIBs restrict training to high-demand occupations
  • Only training programs with good records for placement and wages can receive WIA funds
  • Performance measures for all WIA programs hold programs accountable for employment, earnings, retention, credentials, and (soon) costs

LONG-TERM CARE INDUSTRY’S RESPONSE TO SHORTAGES

  • A number of factors contribute to recruitment and retention problems
    • Low wages
    • Poor working conditions
    • Lack of upward mobility
    • Part-time work with irregular hours
  • Approaches for dealing with shortages include:
    • Improving wages and benefits
    • Creating advancement opportunities
    • Improving the workplace environment
    • Developing new worker pools

EXAMPLES OF WORKFORCE INVESTMENT INITIATIVES WITH LTC

  • Delaware County Employment Intervention Project
  • California Caregiver Training Institute
  • Cleveland Achieve
  • Mennonite Village
  • Tucson Direct Caregiver Association

OPPORTUNITIES FOR COLLABORATION

  • Workforce investment can work with long-term care employers:
    • Conduct outreach to employers; ask them to list openings with state and local WIA programs
    • Encourage employers to participate on WIBs and committees
    • Develop sectoral strategies, customized training, and on-the-job training (OJT)
  • Long-term care employers can:
    • List openings with state and local WIA programs
    • Participate on state and local WIBs
    • Participate in development and offering of sectoral programs, customized training, and OJT
    • Make jobs more attractive to workforce investment and job seekers by improving pay and retention

CONTACT THE AUTHORS

  • Mike Fishman, Senior Vice President, The Lewin Group, (703)269-5655, mike.fishman@lewin.com
  • Burt Barnow, Associate Director for Research, Institute for Policy Studies, Johns Hopkins University, (410)516-5388, barnow@jhu.edu

View full report

Preview
Download

"04cfpack.pdf" (pdf, 1.09Mb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"04cfpk02.pdf" (pdf, 819.67Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®

View full report

Preview
Download

"04cfpk03.pdf" (pdf, 2.13Mb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®