National Study of Child Protective Services Systems and Reform Efforts. Review of State CPS Policy. Endnotes

04/01/2003

1 During the years of 1997-2001, the national average proportion of reports ranged from 53.4 to 56.6 percent for professionals and from 43.5 to 46.6 percent for nonprofessionals. (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Children and Families. Child Maltreatment 2001 (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2003).

2 While in general States agreed that social services personnel, medical personnel, mental health personnel, educators, law enforcement and legal professionals, child daycare providers, and substitute care providers should be mandated reporters, many States specified other professions. For example, commercial film and photographic print professionals, domestic violence shelter employees, clergy serving in nonpastoral capacities, dieticians, and other professionals were specifically named in some policy manuals.

3 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children's Bureau. Child Maltreatment 1996: Reports From the States to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1998.)

4 Ibid.

5 U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration on Children and Youth. Child Maltreatment 2001. (Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2003.)

6 U. S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Children's Bureau, and Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation. National Study of Child Protective Services Systems and Reform Efforts: Literature Review. (Washington, D. C.: Author, 2001.)

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