A National Study of Assisted Living for the Frail Elderly: Final Summary Report. Admission and Retention Policies

11/01/2000

Most ALFs reported a willingness to admit residents with moderate physical limitations, such as using a wheelchair (71 percent) or needing help with locomotion (62 percent) (i.e., walking or using a wheelchair or cart). However, fewer than half the ALFs (44 percent) were willing to admit residents who needed assistance with transfers (i.e., in or out of bed, a chair or wheelchair). Administrators also reported that fewer than half the ALFs (47 percent) would admit a resident with moderate to severe cognitive impairment.8

Facilities also had criteria about the retention of residents with certain types of conditions or problems, although, as with admission policies, many facilities had idiosyncratic policies (see footnote #8). Nearly one-third of the administrators (31 percent) reported that the ALF would not retain a resident who used a wheelchair (or that “it depends”), and 38 percent would discharge a resident who needed assistance with locomotion. More than half (55 percent) of the ALFs would not retain a resident with moderate to severe cognitive impairment, and 76 percent not retain residents with behavioral symptoms (e.g., wandering). Seventy-two percent of the ALFs would not retain a resident who needed nursing care for more than 14 days.

View full report

Preview
Download

"finales.pdf" (pdf, 907.67Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®