NATIONAL PLAN TO ADDRESS ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE: 2017 UPDATE. Strategy 1.E: Facilitate Translation of Findings into Medical Practice and Public Health Programs

09/01/2017

Reporting Research Findings. NIA operates the ADEAR Center, the primary Federal Government resource for information about AD/ADRD, research, and caregiving. The ADEAR Center educates the public about the latest research findings and clinical trial participation via free, evidence-based information available online and in print. In addition, NIA disseminates research findings through the media, social media, and annual research progress reports.

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Resources for the Dementia Services Community. The interagency ROAR (NIH, ACL, CDC) group hosted an update in the popular webinar series in 2017 for professionals on AD/ADRD resources that drew 500+ participants and offered continuing education credit. Free continuing education is available to professionals who need it when they view recorded webinars from 2017 and earlier series. This continuing education is available through 2018.

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Exploring the Evidence for Prevention. In 2015, NIH initiated a project involving the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM), to conduct a systematic review of the evidence on prevention of clinical AD-type dementia, MCI, and age-related cognitive decline (AHRQ), and to shape these findings into a set of recommendations for public health practice and research (NASEM). This effort is driven by the intense interest in recent years -- in the United States and internationally -- to identify ways to reduce the risk for cognitive decline and AD/ADRD. Ultimately, the effectiveness of 13 interventions was explored by the Minnesota Evidence-based Practice Center (supported by AHRQ). While most interventions showed no evidence of benefit to delay cognitive decline or AD; some forms of cognitive training were found to improve performance on specific tasks, though the transfer of benefits to other cognitive areas may be limited. A review of the available evidence also showed that some types of physical activity, and vitamin B12 plus folic acid may benefit cognitive performance in some areas for adults with normal cognition. A report from NASEM detailing recommendations for public health messaging based on these findings was released in June 2017.

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