Literature Review: Developing a Conceptual Framework to Assess the Sustainability of Community Coalitions Post-Federal Funding. B. Conceptual Models of Program Sustainability in Community Coalitions and Partnerships

01/07/2011

Plans for sustainability are different, depending on the goals and objectives of each community coalition. As such, the conceptual models of sustainability in community coalitions offer different approaches. The following section describes six conceptual models and frameworks that have shaped the literature on the sustainability of community coalitions:

  1. Model for Sustainability in Community Health Partnerships (Alexander et al., 2003)
  2. Partnerships for Quality Sustainability Framework (Edwards et al., 2007)
  3. Model of Community-Based Program Sustainability (Mancini & Marek, 2004)
  4. Conceptual Model for Evaluating Sustainability of Community Health Initiatives (Beery et al., 2005)
  5. Framework for Conceptualizing Program Sustainability (Shediac-Rizkallah & Bone, 1998)
  6. Framework of Collaborative Sustainability (Rog et al., 2004)

These models were selected for two key reasons. First, they were identified in the literature as salient frameworks for conceptualizing sustainability in programs, community coalitions, and community health initiatives. Second, each model or framework provides a unique approach to conceptualizing sustainability. For example, the Model for Sustainability in Community Health Partnerships (Alexander et al., 2003) identifies sustainability-enhancing factors that can be used to evaluate the strength of partnerships. The Partnerships for Quality Sustainability Framework (Edwards et al., 2007) maps sustainability goals to sustainability elements. The Model for Community-Based Program Sustainability (Mancini & Marek, 2004) illustrates how different elements of a community-based program can contribute to middle-range program results and sustainability. The Conceptual Model for Evaluating Sustainability of Community Health Initiatives (Beery et al., 2005) shows that there are three elements of a community health initiative that can be sustained: the partnership, the partnership’s activities, and other capacity-building activities. The Framework for Conceptualizing Program Sustainability (Shediac-Rizkallah & Bone, 1998) is one of the earliest efforts to conceptualize program sustainability and identifies different factors that influence sustainability. Finally, the Framework of Collaborative Sustainability (Rog et al., 2004) relates coalition factors that contribute to different stages of sustainability. These models illustrate the key factors that can contribute to sustainability of community coalitions, and are explained in greater detail in the remainder of the section.  

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