Iowa's Limited Benefit Plan. H. Characteristics by Return to FIP

05/01/1997

There are no large differences between the characteristics of the approximately 20 percent of never-canceled cases that return to FIP in the three months after the end of the LBP period and the approximately 80 percent that do not return to FIP in these months (Table III.11).(22) However, there is a pattern in the differences that do exist, and this pattern is similar to the pattern of differences between canceled and never-canceled LBP cases. Recall that canceled LBP cases on average appear to be somewhat more disadvantaged than never-canceled cases. Similarly, never-canceled LBP cases that return to FIP after the 12-month LBP appear to be somewhat more disadvantaged than never-canceled LBP cases that do not return to FIP. In particular, the cases that return have slightly more people and more children, and they receive higher FIP and Food Stamp benefits in the month prior to the beginning of the LBP assignment than cases that do not return. In addition, the specific individuals assigned to the LBP on never-canceled LBP cases that return to FIP are somewhat more likely than those on cases that do not return to be female, nonwhite, unmarried, and to have completed high school; they are also younger. Taken together, Tables III.7 and III.11 suggest that individuals from less advantaged demographic groups (unmarried, females, nonwhites, less educated) with larger households and more young children are somewhat more likely than those from more advantaged groups to return to FIP after being assigned to the LBP--either through cancellation of the LBP assignment or after completing the LBP term.

Table III.10
Table III.11