Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 2009-2013. Employment and Work-related Risk Factor 3. Earnings of Low-skilled Workers

04/01/2013

Figure WORK 3b. Median Weekly Wages of Women and Men Working Full-Time with 4 Years of High School Education with No College by Race and Ethnicity (2009 Dollars): 1980-2009

Note: Last data point is 2009. Full-time workers usually work 35 hours per week. Persons of Hispanic ethnicity may be of any race. Beginning in 2002, estimates for Whites and Blacks are for persons reporting a single race only. Due to small sample size, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asians and Native Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders are not shown separately.

Source: Current Population Survey, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

  • Figure WORK 3b shows the median weekly wages in 2009 dollars of low-skilled women and men (those with 4 years of high school education, no college) working full-time by race and ethnicity for selected years. This measure of low skill is based only on educational attainment and does not take other skills based on work experience, training or other credentials into account.
  • In 2009, Non-Hispanic White women with only 4 years of high school education working full-time had median weekly earnings of $556 compared to $497 for similar Non-Hispanic Black women and $495 for similar Hispanic women of any race. Among men working full-time with only 4 years of high school education, median weekly earnings of Non-Hispanic White men were $740 compared to $588 for Non-Hispanic Black men and $594 for Hispanic men of any race.
  • Table WORK 3b provides the detailed estimates used for Figure WORK 3b expressed in constant dollars. In 2009, low-skilled Non-Hispanic White women working full-time had the highest average weekly wages among women working full-time with a high school education at $556. This represents a 9.0 percent increase in their median weekly wages between 1995 and 2009. Over the same time period, similar Non-Hispanic Black women experienced a 13.7 percent increase in their median weekly wages while similar Hispanic women of any race experienced an 11.5 percent increase.
  • Among low-skilled men working full-time, median weekly wages increased 1.2 percent among Non-Hispanic White men and 5.2 percent among Non-Hispanic Black men between 1995 and 2009. Low-skilled Hispanic men working full-time had a 1.7 percent increase in median weekly wages over the same time period.

Table WORK 3.b. Median Weekly Wages of Women and Men Working Full-Time with 4 Years of High School Education with No College by Race and Ethnicity (2009 Dollars): 1979-2009

  Women Men
White Black Hispanic2 White Black Hispanic2
1979 $512 $479 $485 $865 $691 $763
1980 501 468 478 830 677 721
1981 496 466 477 826 656 722
1982 510 467 489 815 634 711
1983 512 463 489 808 639 690
1984 515 472 499 800 625 684
1985 515 470 483 795 601 663
1986 523 480 484 797 607 657
1987 526 480 475 791 612 647
1988 526 474 486 788 608 643
1989 514 476 483 778 591 621
1990 508 458 485 757 566 617
1991 515 464 476 745 559 605
19921 515 458 735 545
1993 519 452 731 554
1994 517 435 467 731 548 581
1995 510 437 444 731 559 584
1996 510 440 442 734 545 566
1997 517 438 446 750 564 588
1998 531 468 472 765 578 610
1999 532 465 469 770 590 611
2000 538 478 471 757 612 607
2001 550 481 489 758 617 603
2002 560 486 482 762 602 604
2003 564 506 484 760 605 609
2004 563 519 493 761 590 592
2005 554 479 478 744 580 582
2006 543 484 455 749 578 605
2007 541 486 485 743 568 604
2008 533 478 477 735 579 601
2009 556 497 495 740 588 594
Note: Full-time usually work 35 hours per week. Data adjusted to constant 2009 dollars by ASPE using the CPI-U-RS.
1Beginning in 1992, data on educational attainment have been based on the "highest diploma or degree received," rather than the "number of years of school completed." Data for 1994 forward are not directly comparable with data for 1993 and earlier years due to a redesign of the Current Population Survey. Data for 2000-2002 have been revised to incorporate population controls from Census 2000 and new industry and occupational classification systems. The earnings data presented in this table may differ slightly from other published estimates due to methodological differences in calculating medians.
2For 1992 and 1993, earnings data by educational attainment are not available for persons of Hispanic or Latino ethnicity age 25 and over. Beginning in 2003, data refer to persons who selected this race group only; previously, persons identified a group as their main race. In addition, persons whose ethnicity is identified as Hispanic or Latino may be of any race and, therefore, are classified by ethnicity as well as by race.
SOURCE: Current Population Survey, Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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