Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 2005 . Employment and Work-related Risk Factor 3. Earnings of Low-skilled Workers

08/30/2005

Figure WORK 3. Mean Weekly Wages of Women and Men Working Full-Time, Full-Year with No More than a High School Education, by Race (2003 Dollars): Selected Years

Figure WORK 3. Mean Weekly Wages of Women and Men Working Full-Time, Full-Year with No More than a High School Education, by Race (2003 Dollars): Selected Years

Source: Unpublished tabulations from the Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, 1981-2004.

  • Average weekly wages of low-skilled women have been consistently lower than those of low-skilled men. For example, the average weekly wages of non-Hispanic black women without a high school education who worked full-time, full-year were 77 percent of those of men of the same race, education, and work status in 2003 ($464 compared to $605).
  • Non-Hispanic white women have had the highest average weekly wages among low-skilled women working full-time, full-year reaching $561 in 2003. This level is a 20 percent increase over their mean weekly wages in 1980. Over the same time period, non-Hispanic black women and Hispanic women’s weekly wages increased at slower rates (8 percent and 5 percent, respectively).
  • For men, the gap between mean weekly wages of non-Hispanic white and black full-time workers with low education levels has narrowed somewhat over time. Since 1980, the mean weekly wage for low-skilled non-Hispanic black men working full-time has increased by 5 percent, while the mean wage for their white counterparts has declined slightly (by 1 percent). In 2003, the mean weekly wage for low-skilled non-Hispanic black men was $605, or 79 percent of the $766 weekly wage for low-skilled non-Hispanic white men.
  • Over the past two decades, both Hispanic women and men’s wages have lagged behind non-Hispanic whites and blacks among low-skilled full-time workers. In 2003, Hispanic women’s wages were 25 percent lower than non-Hispanic white women and 9 percent lower than non-Hispanic black women. Hispanic men trailed non-Hispanic white men by 33 percent and non-Hispanic black men by 16 percent.

Table WORK 3. Mean Weekly Wages of Women and Men Working Full-Time, Full-Year with No More than a High School Education, by Race (2003 Dollars): Selected Years

  Women Men
  Non-Hispanic White Non-Hispanic Black Hispanic Non-Hispanic White Non-Hispanic Black Hispanic
1980 469 428 401 775 577 585
1981 459 415 406 764 569 575
1982 466 423 407 750 555 554
1983 471 427 407 750 540 567
1984 475 442 413 765 538 570
1985 488 443 406 758 562 559
1986 494 444 429 776 564 544
1987 500 461 413 771 573 540
1988 499 443 412 765 599 543
1989 494 465 420 747 557 524
1990 493 452 395 714 551 508
1991 487 440 395 701 549 489
1992 494 442 409 707 538 500
1993 489 426 396 690 529 484
1994 496 440 398 700 541 480
1995 498 438 384 720 546 480
1996 501 462 397 738 568 476
1997 508 433 406 749 569 513
1998 528 440 409 732 574 509
1999 506 441 401 751 613 507
2000 523 445 391 770 607 516
2001 532 469 410 764 587 521
2002 541 482 413 762 592 543
2003 561 464 464 766 605 605

Note: Full-time, full-year workers work at least 48 weeks per year and 35 hours per week.

Persons of Hispanic ethnicity may be of any race. Beginning in 2002, estimates for Whites and Blacks are for persons reporting a single race only. Due to small sample size, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asians and Native Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders are not shown separately.

Source: Unpublished tabulations from the Current Population Survey, Annual Social and Economic Supplement, 1981-2004.

 

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