Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 2001 . Employment and Work-related Risk Factor 7. Adult/child Disability

03/01/2001

Figure WORK 7. Percentage of the Total Population Reporting a Disability, by Age: 1994

Figure WORK 7. Percentage of the Total Population Reporting a Disability, by Age: 1994

Source:  Unpublished data from the 1994 National Health Interview Survey on Disability, Phase I; 1994 NHIS, and 1994 Family Resources Supplement.


  • In 1994, adults were more likely than children of school age (ages 6 to 17) to have a functional disability, and school-age children were in turn more likely to have a functional disability than younger children (ages 0 to 5).

  • Among the non-elderly population, disability rates were the same for non-Hispanic whites and non-Hispanic blacks (15 percent), but lower for Hispanics (11 percent), as shown in Table WORK 7.

  • While adults were more likely to report a functional disability than children, a higher percentage of children than adults were actually recipients of disability program benefits in 1994, as shown in the bottom panel of Table WORK 7.

Table WORK 7. Percentage of the Total Population Reporting a Disability, by Race and Age: 1994

Functional Disability

All Persons, All Ages 18.3
All Persons under 65 Years 13.9
Racial Categories  
(Persons under 65 Years)  
Non-Hispanic White 14.5
Non-Hispanic Black 14.5
Hispanic 11.3
Age Categories  
Children Ages 0-5 7.2
Children Ages 6-17 9.5
Adults Ages 18-64 16.2
Adults Age 65 and over 51.0

Alternative Measures of Disability

  Functional Disability Work Disability Perceived Disability Disability Program Recipient
Children Ages 0-17 8.7 N/A 2.8 6.7
Adults Ages 18-64 16.2 10.7 7.0 5.7

Note: Functional disability only includes those disabilities expected to last at least 12 months.  Functional disabilities were defined as either: (1) limitations in or inability to perform a variety of physical activities (i.e. walking, lifting, reaching); (2) serious sensory impairments (i.e. inability to read newsprint even with glasses or contact lenses); (3) serious symptoms of mental illness (i.e. frequent depression or anxiety; frequent confusion, disorientation, or difficulty remembering) which has seriously interfered with life for the last year; (4) use of selected assistive devices (i.e. wheelchairs, scooters, walkers); (5) developmental delays for children identified by a physician (i.e. physical, learning); (6) for children under 5, inability to perform age-appropriate functions (i.e. sitting up, walking); and, (7) long-term care needs. Work disability is defined as limitations in or the inability to work as a result of a physical, mental or emotional health condition. Perceived disability is a new disability measure based on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and includes individuals who were perceived by themselves or others as having a disability.  Disability program recipients include persons covered by Supplemental Security Income (SSI), Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI), Special Education Services, Early Intervention Services, and/or disability pensions.

Source: Unpublished data from the 1994 National Health Interview Survey on Disability, Phase I; 1994 NHIS, and 1994 Family Resources Supplement.
 

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