Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 1997. Employment and Work-Related Risk Factor 7. Child Care Expenditures

10/01/1997

Proportion of total family income spent on child care in families with employed mothers is an important dimension of the risk of dependency.

Figure WORK 7. Percent of Monthly Income Spent on Child Care for Preschoolers by Families with Employed Mothers, 1993

Figure WORK 7. Percent of Monthly Income Spent on Child Care for Preschoolers by Families with Employed Mothers, 1993

  • Poor families with employed mothers of preschoolers spent a much larger percentage of their monthly family income on child care, relative to non-poor families with employed mothers (18 percent compared to 7 percent).
  • As shown in Table WORK 7, employed single mothers (no husband present) spent a larger percentage of their monthly family income on child care expenses than did employed married mothers.
  • Table WORK 7 shows that employed mothers who received assistance from AFDC, WIC or Food Stamps spent a larger percentage of their total monthly family income on child care relative to non-recipients (13 percent compared to 7 percent). Of recipients, those that received AFDC spent the largest percent of their monthly family income on child care.

Table WORK 7. Percent of Monthly Income Spent on Child Care for Preschoolers by Families with Employed Mothers, 1993

Category Percent
All Families 7.6
Racial Categories
Non-Hispanic White 7.4
Non-Hispanic Black 8.5
Hispanic 9.0
Marital Status
Married, Husband Present 7.0
Widowed, Separated, Divorced 12.3
Never Married 12.5
Poverty Status
Poor 17.7
Non-Poor 7.3
Program Participation
Recipient 12.8
AFDC 17.1
WIC 12.3
Food Stamps 14.6
Non-Recipient 7.3

Note: Non-recipients are those in families not receiving AFDC, general assistance, Food Stamps or WIC.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "What Does It Cost to Mind Our Preschoolers," Current Population Reports, Series P70-52, 1995.