Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 1997. Economic Security Risk Factor11. Percent Residing in High-Poverty Neighborhoods

10/01/1997

High poverty neighborhoods are often associated with relatively lower quality services (e.g., education, medical) that can have a negative effect on development and increase the risk of dependence.

Figure ECON 11. Percent of Children Residing in High-Povetry Neighborhoods, 1990

Figure ECON 11. Percent of Children Residing in High-Povetry Neighborhoods, 1990

  • Nearly a quarter of all children resided in neighborhoods where over 20 percent of the residents were poor and 5 percent of children resided in neighborhoods where over 40 percent of residents were poor.
  • Black children and Hispanic children were disproportionately represented in these poor neighborhoods, with a slightly higher percentage of black children living in poor neighborhoods than Hispanic children.

Table ECON 11. Percent of Children Residing in High-Poverty Neighborhoods, 1990

  Total White Black Hispanic
Neighborhood over 20% Poor 22.9 12.2 56.4 46.6
Neighborhood over 40% Poor 5.0 1.2 18.6 11.3

Note: Neighborhoods are defined as census tracts and block-numbering areas. Both metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas are included. The poverty rate is the percent of all persons in the neighborhood living in families below the poverty line in 1990.

Source: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Trends in the Well-Being of America's Children and Youth: 1997. Table PF 3.2.