Indicators of Welfare Dependence: Annual Report to Congress, 1997. Economic Security Risk Factor 12. Residential Mobility

10/01/1997

Frequent changes of residence are disruptive events for children and may increase the risk of dependence.

Figure ECON 12. Percent of Individuals and Families who Moved in a Given One-Year Period

Figure ECON 12. Percent of Individuals and Families who Moved in a Given One-Year Period

 

  • Female-headed families with children were much more likely to move in a year than married-couple families with children, in each of the one-year periods shown.
  • Residential mobility decreased one percentage point every two years for children age 1 to 14 from 1987 - 1988 to 1993 - 1994.
  • Residential mobility for adults age 25 and above remained essentially unchanged, dropping only one percentage point over this period.

Table ECON 12. Percent of Individuals and Families who Movedin a Given One-Year Period

  1987 - 88 1989 - 90 1991 - 92 1993 - 94
Age 1 to 14 20 19 18 17
Age 25 and Above 15 15 15 14
Married-Couple Families with Children 17 17 16 15
Female Single-Parent Families with Children 29 29 31 28

Note: Residential mobility measures the percent of individuals over age 1 who changed houses between March of the first year and March of the next year. The mobility of married-couple and female single-parent families is the percent of householders age 15 to 54 with own children under 18 who changed houses.

Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, "Geographical Mobility," Current Population Reports, Series P20-456, 473 and 485, various years.