The Importance of Quality Implementation for Research, Practice, and Policy. Who is Responsible for Quality Implementation?

02/01/2013

The finding that at least 23 factors may affect implementation and that the implementation process involves 14 steps can seem overwhelming to those who want to conduct a new program. However, it is important to keep two important points in mind:

1.      There are many examples of well-implemented programs. Success is possible.

2.      Implementation is a mutual responsibility shared by several groups (Wandersman, et al. 2008). Solving the challenge of quality implementation requires the active collaboration of four major groups of stakeholders: researchers/program developers (or others who provide technical assistance), local practitioners, funders, and local administrators.

The chances for quality implementation are enhanced when multiple stakeholders work collaboratively and approach implementation in a careful, systematic fashion over time. See Figure 1.

 

Figure 1. Collaboration Among Multiple Stakeholders Leads to Quality Implementation

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