HHS Plan for Integration of Surveys. Tab H: Sample Size Specifications for the Design of the Medical Expenditure Panel (MEP)

07/03/1996

NOTE: This tab includes information on the Medical Expenditure Panel that updates information included in the body of the report.

 

1996

The 1996 MEP sample would consist of a sample of approximately 10,500 households selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 1995 National Health Interview Survey (second and third quarters of the NHIS sample). The targeted overall response rate for obtaining calendar year 1996 data on health care use and expenditures is 80.75 percent (based on a 95 percent response rate for the NHIS and a 85 percent conditional response rate for three rounds of MEP data collection). Consequently, the MEP sample of 10,500 households responding to the NHIS interview would consist of approximately 8,925 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year 1996 data.

1997

A new MEP sample of approximately 5,150 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 1996 National Health Interview Survey. This sample would consist of an oversample of the policy relevant population subgroups identified for the 1996 NMES-3 design. In addition, the entire 1996 panel of 8,925 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 1997 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 1997 would consist of approximately 12,600 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year 1997 data (4,375 households from the new sample, 8,225 from the 1996 MEP sample). Coupled with data from the MCBS, this would provide the department with the analytic capabilities first proposed for the 1996 NMES-3 with respect to sample size.

1998

A new MEP sample of approximately 4,700 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 1997 National Health Interview Survey. In addition, the entire 1997 panel of 4,375 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 1998 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 1998 would consist of approximately 8,000 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data (4,000 households from the new sample, 4,000 from the 1997 MEP sample). The 1996 MEP would be retired.

1999

A new MEP sample of approximately 5,100 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 1998 National Health Interview Survey. In addition, the entire 1998 panel of 4,000 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 1999 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 1999 would consist of approximately 8,000 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data (4,300 households from the new sample, 3,700 from the 1998 MEP sample). The 1997 MEP would be retired.

2000

A new MEP sample of approximately 4,700 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 1999 National Health Interview Survey. In addition, the entire 1999 panel of 4,300 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 2000 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 2000 would consist of approximately 8,000 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data (4,000 households from the new sample, 4,000 from the 1999 MEP sample). The 1998 MEP would be retired.

2001

A new MEP sample of approximately 5,100 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 2000 National Health Interview Survey. In addition, the entire 2000 panel of 4,000 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 1999 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 2001 would consist of approximately 8,000 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data (4,300 households from the new sample, 3,700 from the 2000 MEP sample). The 1999 MEP would be retired.

2002

A new MEP sample of approximately 10,120 households would be selected as a nationally representative subsample of households that responded to the 2001 National Health Interview Survey. This sample would consist of an oversample of the policy relevant population subgroups identified for the 1996 NMES-3 design. In addition, the entire 2001 panel of 4,300 households would be continued to obtain calendar year 2002 data on health care use and expenditures (with a targeted round specific response rate of 96 percent). Consequently, the MEP sample for 2002 would consist of approximately 12,600 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data (8,600 households from the new sample, 4,000 from the 2001 MEP sample). Coupled with data from the MCBS, this would provide the department with the analytic capabilities first proposed for the 1996 NMES-3 with respect to sample size.
The 2000 MEP would be retired.

2003-2006

Drop back to an overall sample of approximately 8,000 completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data on health care utilization and expenditures, with approximately 4,000-4,300 continuing from the previous year for each of the years.

2007

Begin ten year cycle again with increase to 12,600 households completing three core rounds of data collection to obtain calendar year data on health care utilization and expenditures.