The Evaluation of the Tribal Welfare-to-Work Grants Program: Initial Implementation Findings. Site Visits

01/29/2005

Between August 1999 and April 2000, a two- or three-person team visited each of the 10 WtW grantees in the study sample. The site visit teams collected existing materials (for example, reports, analyses, data compilations) prepared for and by the tribal grantees and interviewed more than 280 key informants (see Table 1.4). Because of the broad scope of the tribal evaluation, interviews were conducted with state and county officials and private-sector employers located on or near the reservation, as well as with tribal officials, WtW program staff, and staff at other tribal programs (e.g., social services, education, workforce development). In addition, informal discussions were conducted with WtW program participants.

Table 1.4
Study Informants

Grantee

Tribal Officials Tribal Staff Tribal Staff Other Partners State Staff Employers WtW Participants Total
WtW Other Tribal State/ County

CIMC

3 4 8 n.a. 5 0 1 3 4 28

Cherokee

3 2 2 n.a. 1 2 3 0 3 16

Kickapoo

3 1 4 n.a. 1 1 3 0 1 14

Klamath

7 2 2 4 0 0 1 2 3 21

Navajo Nation

8 4 10 2 0 2 2 0 3 31

Nez Perce

15 5 9 4 0 6 6 2 6 53

Red Lake

13 2 10 n.a. 3 5 3 4 10 50

TCC

2 2 12 2 0 1 2 0 6 27

TAT

3 3 7 n.a. 1 3 3 2 4 26

White Earth

8 1 6 n.a. 1 1 1 2 0 20

Totals

65 26 70 12 12 21 25 15 40 286
n.a. = Not applicable: tribe does not operate a TANF program.

After each site visit, a report summarizing the findings was submitted to the grantee with a request for feedback, including identification of any errors or omissions. The grantee feedback was incorporated in the final report prepared for the tribe. To encourage full disclosure by all study informants, no individual informant is identified in study reports.

Endnotes

1.  In this report, "Indian tribe" refers to any federally recognized Indian tribe, rancheria, pueblo, or Alaska Native village.

2.  "Indian country" refers to American Indian reservations, Alaska Native villages and adjacent counties, and the states of Alaska and Oklahoma.

3.  See, for example, Nightingale (2001) and Perez-Johnson et al. (2000).

4.  Not every federally recognized tribe was eligible for a WtW grant. Only those tribes that operated a TANF or NEW program, or that met the "substantial services" criterion, were eligible. Substantial services is defined as having operated an employment program that served a minimum of 50 public assistance recipients over the last two program or fiscal years, or where 20 percent of the people served had received public assistance during the most recent program or fiscal year.

5.  Many tribes and Native villages maintain a list of members or people enrolled in the tribe or village.

6.  In this report, "reservation" refers to any lands owned by an Indian tribe.