Evaluation of the Personal Health Record Pilot for Medicare Fee-For Service Enrollees from South Carolina. Hypotheses.

08/01/2009

HYPOTHESIS 1: BENEFICIARIES WITH CHRONIC CONDITIONS OR DIAGNOSES ARE MORE LIKELY TO USE MYPHRSC THAN BENEFICIARIES WITHOUT SUCH CONDITIONS.

Ever log in. We did not find consistent patterns of use based on illness diagnosis.  Individuals with the diagnosis of “coronary artery disease” and "cataract" were more likely than individuals without those diagnoses to return to MyPHRSC and log in after initial registration (p<0.05).  Individuals with the diagnosis of “diabetes” were significantly less likely (p<0.05) than individuals without diabetes to return to MyPHRSC and log in after initial registration.  None of the remaining selected chronic conditions were statistically significant predictors of logging in to MyPHRSC after registering.

Log in more than once. Individuals with the diagnosis of "cataract" were 1.2 times more likely to log into MyPHRSC multiple times than individuals without this diagnosis.  Individuals with a diagnosis of "osteoarthritis" were significantly less likely (0.8 times, p<0.05) to log in more than once than individuals without osteoarthritis.  No significant difference existed between individuals having no chronic condition and those having one or more chronic conditions. 

Log in more than two separate months. Individuals with the diagnosis of “chronic obstructive lung disease” and "cataract" were significantly more likely to log in to MyPHRSC in 3 or more separate months than individuals without this condition.  These individuals were 1.4 times (p<0.05) as likely to have logged in during 3 or more separate months during the study period. In terms of logging in during multiple months, no significant difference exists between individuals having no chronic condition and individuals who have one or more chronic conditions.     

HYPOTHESIS 2: WOMEN ARE MORE LIKELY THAN MEN TO USE MYPHRSC.

Ever log in. In multivariate analyses, we found that women were not more likely to use MyPHRSC than men.  Rather, we found that men were significantly more likely to return to MyPHRSC and log in after initial registration.  Men were approximately 1.5 times (p<.01) more likely than women to ever log in.

Log in more than once or in more than two separate months. Women were no more likely than men to log in to MyPHRSC more than once. Women were no more likely than men to log in to MyPHRSC in multiple months of the pilot.

HYPOTHESIS 3: YOUNGER BENEFICIARIES ARE MORE LIKELY TO USE MYPHRSC THAN OLDER BENEFICIARIES.

Ever log in. The youngest beneficiaries (aged 64 and under) were not significantly more likely to use MyPHRSC than their older counterparts.  In fact, individuals between the ages of 65 and 69 were slightly more likely to return to MyPHRSC and log in after initial registration.  Statistical significance was found in comparisons with two of the four other age groups (i.e., 64 and under; 75 — 79).

Log in more than once. Beneficiaries aged 65-69 were less likely to log in to MyPHRSC more than once than any other age group.  This finding was statistically significant (p<0.05).

Log in more than two separate months. Users under the age of 65 were less likely to use MyPHRSC for more than two months than every other age group, with statistical significance in all comparisons except with users over age 80.  

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