Evaluation of Family Preservation and Reunification Programs: Final Report - Volume Two. 2.3 Caretakers' Reports of Services

09/01/2002

In the second interviews, caretakers were asked if they had received any of a set of specific services in the time since the first interview. Results are shown in Table 2-3.

Table 2-3
Caretaker Report of Services, Post-Treatment Interview
  Kentucky New Jersey Tennessee
C E p C E p C E p
% % % % % %
Daycare 5 19 0.001 10 7   26 26  
Help in finding a place to live 1 4   5 2   17 5 0.04
Staying at an emergency shelter 1 1   2 1   6 0 0.03
Medical or dental care 8 15 0.07 36 42   34 16 0.03
Transportation 7 16 0.02 14 12   17 19  
Education services/GED 1 4   2 2   9 8  
Parent education/training classes 13 19   8 11   20 8 0.06
Legal services 7 11   11 7   9 5  
Counseling 35 52 0.003 50 56   9 17  
Respite care 1 1   0 1   0 0  
Homemaker services 1 3   6 3   14 3 0.02
A parent aide to help you 1 4   7 4   11 5  
Note: C = Control Group, E = Experimental Group

Kentucky. A significantly greater proportion of caretakers from the experimental group reported receiving such services as day care (19% vs. 5%), transportation (16% vs. 7%), and counseling (52% vs. 35%). All were significant at p = .05 or less. Reported receipt of medical or dental care was also a higher for the experimental group than for the control group (15% vs. 8%, p = .07). (14) In a separate question, caretakers were asked whether the agency provided homemaker services or the assistance of parent aide. Approximately two percent of all caretakers reported having a homemaker and about three percent reported receiving assistance from a parent aide, with slightly greater but not significantly different percentages reported in the experimental group as compared to the control group. When caretakers were asked whether they did not receive any services they felt were needed, 27 percent of the control group responded affirmatively compared to 19 percent of the experimental group, a difference that was not statistically significant in either the primary or secondary analyses.

New Jersey. There were no significant differences between the experimental and control groups in receipt of any of these services in the primary analyses. (15) About 4 percent of the caretakers reported having a homemaker, with no significant difference between the experimental and control groups. Control group caretakers significantly more often reported they did not receive services that were needed (56% vs. 42%, p = .01).

Tennessee. On most of the services items, control group caretakers more often reported receiving the service, these differences being significant at .06 or lower for five of the items listed in Table 2-3. Experimental group percentages were higher for only two items, counseling (reported by far fewer caretakers in Tennessee than in Kentucky and New Jersey) and transportation, neither difference being significant. These rather surprising results, indicating more services for the control group, contradict data on caseworker activities presented above and

data from the Tennessee caseworkers (discussed in Section 2.5). Control group caretakers more often reported they did not receive services that were needed (39% vs. 24%, p = .1).

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