Education and Employment of Disconnected Low-Income Men. Low-Income Men Have Less Personal Income to Contribute to Their Families

08/01/2013

The target population for these briefs is defined by the income of the family in which they live. The exact income that puts these men into the low-income category depends on the size of the family and the income of all of its members. Personal income is the income earned or otherwise received by the individual low-income man.

The vast majority of low-income men have personal income of less than $25,000 a year. Nationally, 83 percent of low-income men report positive personal income (i.e., income greater than $0). Of those reporting positive income, 37 percent report income of less than $10,000, or below the poverty threshold for a single person (figure 2). This is more than double the share of all men age 18 to 44 (16 percent). Low-income men are twice as likely as all men to report personal income between $10,000 and $25,000, or around twice the poverty level for a single person (49 percent versus 25 percent).

Low-income men are half as likely as men overall to report income between $25,000 and $45,000 (13 percent versus 26 percent). Only 1 percent of low-income men report income of $45,000 or more. In contrast, 33 percent of men overall report personal income greater than $45,000.

 

Figure 2. Personal Income of US Men Age 18–44, 2008–10

figure 2

Source: ASPE tabulations of the American Community Survey (2008–10).
Note: Low-income men live in families with incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level and do not have four-year college degrees.

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