Disabilities Among TANF Recipients: Evidence from the NHIS. Part B. Family Members with Disabilities

05/15/2009

Exhibit B1.

Other Adult Family Members with Disability by Population Group

Exhibit B1. Other Adult Family Members with Disability by Population Group. See Long Description for data.

Source:  Authors’ calculations from the National Health Interview Survey, 2005/2006

 

  • Less than five percent of TANF recipients and Food Stamp recipients have an adult family member with a self-care or routine activity limitation. This is similar to the rate for low-income single mothers and slightly higher than for all adults.
  • In all population groups, having a family member with a work limitation is more common than with a self-care or routine activity limitation. About 6 percent of TANF recipients and 9 percent of Food Stamp recipients have a family member with a work limitation.
  • About a tenth of TANF and Food Stamp recipients have a family member that is receiving disability benefits (public or private). This is more than double the rate of all adults with a family member receiving benefits.
  • The percentages of recipients with adult family members with disability are lower than the percentages with disabilities themselves in part because many of these recipient families do not include another adult. This is also true for low-income single mothers, most of whom do not have another adult in the family.

 

Exhibit B2.
Children with Disability by Population Group

Exhibit B2. Children with Disability by Population Group. See Long Description for data.

Source:  Authors’ calculations from the National Health Interview Survey, 2005/2006.

 

  • Almost three percent of TANF recipients and Food Stamp recipients have a child with a self-care or activity limitation. These measures are defined somewhat differently than for adults to consider age appropriate activities for children. A smaller percentage of all adults and low-income single mothers have a child with a disability in the family.
  • About three percent of TANF recipients have a child receiving public disability benefits (SSI) with a slightly higher rate among Food Stamp recipients. The rate is somewhat lower for low-income single mothers. Less than one percent of all adults have a child receiving public disability benefits. Acs and Loprest (2007) found similar results using the 2005 CPS — 4.1 percent of TANF recipients had a child receiving SSI.

 

Exhibit B3.
Composite Measures of Family Member with Disability by Population Group

Exhibit B3. Composite Measures of Family Member with Disability by Population Group. See Long Description for data.

Source:  Authors’ calculations from the National Health Interview Survey, 2005/2006.

 

  • Among TANF recipients, 12 percent have another adult family member with a self-care limitation or work limitation or a family member who receives public disability benefits. Five percent of TANF recipients have a child who either receives SSI or has an activity limitation. Altogether, about 14 percent of TANF recipients have a family member with a disability (regardless of their own disability status). This means that some families have both a child and another adult family member with a disability. A slightly higher percentage of Food Stamp recipients have a family member with a disability, 17 percent.
  • Fewer low-income single mothers have a family member with a disability than TANF recipients stemming from the lower rate of other adult household members with a disability.
  • Seven percent of all adults have a family member with a disability, without taking into account their own disability status.

 

Exhibit B4.
Composite Head and Family Member with Disability by Population Group

Exhibit B4. Composite Head and Family Member with Disability by Population Group. See Long Description for data.

Source:  Authors’ calculations from the National Health Interview Survey, 2005/2006.
Note: Family head here refers to the reference adult in the household used in Part A to measure adult disability.

 

  • About half of TANF recipients have a disability themselves or have a family member with a disability, using our broad measure of disability. Even using the more restrictive composite measure of adult disability (individuals with a self-care or routine activity limitation), almost a quarter of TANF recipients have a disability themselves or a family member with a disability. Food Stamp recipients have similar prevalence of disability on these measures as TANF recipients.
  • As with all the individual measures of disability, these composite measures of disability are higher among TANF recipients and Food Stamp recipients than low-income single mothers and all adults.
  • About 7 percent of TANF recipients have a disability themselves and have a family member with a disability using the broad measure of disability. This is roughly one-sixth of the 43 percent of TANF recipients with a disability using the broad measure (see Exhibit A6). When using the more restrictive definition of adult disability, only half of one percent of recipients has a disability and has a family member with a disability.

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