A Demographic Snapshot of Disconnected Low-Income Men. Notes

08/01/2013

  1. In 2010, the year for the data estimates, the federal poverty threshold was $11,344 for a single adult and $17,552 for a family of three with one child. Twice the pov-erty level was $22,688 for a single adult and $35,104 for a family of three (http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/poverty/data/threshld/).
  2. Men in the armed forces and those in group quarters (college dorms, correctional facilities, hospitals) are excluded from the present analysis because of data limitations.
  3. Unless specified otherwise, statistics are based on the American Community Survey (2008–10).
  4. Statistics are based on US Department of Health and Hu-man Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Plan-ning and Evaluation (ASPE) tabulations of the American Community Survey (2008–10).
  5. Labor Force Statistics from the Current Population Sur-vey, seasonally adjusted unemployment rate, 2008–10 average, at http://data.bls.gov/pdq/querytool.jsp?survey=ln (accessed August 2012). Also see Margaret Simms, Karina Fortuny, Marla McDaniel, and William Monson, “Education and Employment of Disconnected Low-Income Men” (Washington, DC: The Urban Insti-tute, 2013), Race, Place, and Poverty Symposium Issue Brief 2.
  6. Metropolitan areas are the Core Based Statistical Areas (CBSAs) as defined by the US Office of Management and Budget. CBSAs consist of the county or counties or equiv-alent entities associated with at least one core (urbanized area) with a population of at least 10,000 people, and the adjacent counties that have a high degree of social and economic integration with the core urbanized area.
  7. African American refers to non-Hispanic African Ameri-can or black and includes those who identified themselves in the decennial census as black or African American only. White refers to non-Hispanic white and includes those who identified themselves in the census as white only. People of Hispanic origin may be of any race. Respondents who identified as other or two or more races in the census are grouped under “other non-Hispanic.”

Appendix Table 1. State Rankings by Number and Share of Low-Income Men

State Low-income men Rank by size Share of state population Rank by share
United States 14,967,262   28%  
California 2,070,553 1 30% 20
Texas 1,488,313 2 33% 11
Florida 954,954 3 32% 16
New York 823,623 4 24% 37
Illinois 565,278 5 25% 35
Ohio 539,871 6 29% 23
Georgia 533,939 7 32% 15
North Carolina 513,019 8 33% 13
Michigan 503,707 9 31% 18
Pennsylvania 495,706 10 24% 39
Arizona 361,493 11 33% 12
Tennessee 356,875 12 34% 9
Indiana 324,393 13 30% 21
Washington 299,360 14 25% 33
Missouri 289,688 15 30% 22
Virginia 282,013 16 21% 43
Alabama 264,578 17 34% 8
New Jersey 263,595 18 18% 47
South Carolina 249,980 19 33% 10
Wisconsin 249,119 20 26% 32
Kentucky 247,700 21 34% 7
Colorado 237,606 22 26% 31
Louisiana 230,095 23 30% 19
Oklahoma 213,508 24 35% 6
Oregon 207,789 25 31% 17
Minnesota 206,197 26 22% 42
Massachusetts 195,417 27 18% 46
Mississippi 182,584 28 38% 1
Arkansas 178,200 29 37% 3
Maryland 170,839 30 18% 48
Utah 139,437 31 27% 29
Nevada 138,780 32 28% 27
Kansas 134,783 33 29% 24
Iowa 133,424 34 27% 30
New Mexico 125,262 35 37% 2
West Virginia 105,537 36 36% 4
Connecticut 100,275 37 18% 49
Idaho 93,190 38 35% 5
Nebraska 82,506 39 27% 28
Maine 56,845 40 28% 26
Montana 50,053 41 32% 14
Rhode Island 42,435 42 25% 36
Hawaii 40,548 43 19% 45
South Dakota 36,154 44 28% 25
New Hampshire 35,180 45 17% 51
Delaware 33,251 46 23% 41
North Dakota 28,109 47 24% 38
Alaska 24,982 48 21% 44
Vermont 24,178 49 25% 34
Wyoming 22,012 50 23% 40
District of Columbia 20,299 51 17% 50

Source: ASPE tabulations of the American Community Survey (2008–10).

Note: Low-income men are age 18–44, live in families with incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, and do not have four-year college degrees.

Appendix Table 2. Metropolitan Areas with 50,000 or More Low-Income Men

Metropolitan area Low-income men Rank by size Share of metro population Rank by share
United States 14,967,262   28%  
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA 760,180 1 30% 11
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA 739,085 2 22% 43
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI 407,380 3 24% 37
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 348,130 4 29% 16
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 342,600 5 30% 10
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL 280,965 6 30% 15
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 263,395 7 27% 25
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 249,125 8 33% 6
Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ 229,310 9 30% 13
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 207,665 10 21% 45
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI 200,320 11 28% 20
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA 161,650 12 20% 46
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 150,760 13 27% 23
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 145,130 14 14% 52
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 133,440 15 30% 14
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH 125,775 16 16% 51
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 124,115 17 19% 47
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 120,210 18 30% 12
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 119,935 19 33% 9
Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO 116,140 20 24% 35
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 113,935 21 19% 48
Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, CA 108,820 22 29% 17
St. Louis, MO-IL 106,845 23 23% 40
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA 105,325 24 25% 33
Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX 103,340 25 29% 18
Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 102,615 26 27% 21
Columbus, OH 90,490 27 27% 26
Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 84,855 28 23% 38
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC 84,575 29 26% 29
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 82,905 30 26% 32
Pittsburgh, PA 81,865 31 22% 42
Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 81,355 32 26% 27
Kansas City, MO-KS 81,120 33 23% 41
Baltimore-Towson, MD 79,050 34 18% 50
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN 78,530 35 27% 22
Fresno, CA 78,160 36 46% 2
Memphis, TN-MS-AR 73,650 37 33% 7
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX 73,460 38 54% 1
Oklahoma City, OK 72,970 39 33% 8
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 69,265 40 26% 30
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 65,145 41 18% 49
Bakersfield-Delano, CA 63,260 42 44% 3
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, RI-MA 61,290 43 23% 39
Tucson, AZ 58,570 44 37% 5
Jacksonville, FL 58,180 45 26% 31
Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 57,335 46 26% 28
El Paso, TX 56,325 47 43% 4
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA 56,055 48 28% 19
Salt Lake City, UT 54,590 49 24% 34
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 53,745 50 21% 44
Birmingham-Hoover, AL 51,650 51 27% 24
Raleigh-Cary, NC 50,360 52 24% 36
Not in Census MSA with ≥ 50,000 low-income men age 18–44 7,302,315   32%  

Source: ASPE tabulations of the American Community Survey (2008–10).

Note: Low-income men are age 18–44, live in families with incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, and do not have four-year college degrees.

Appendix Table 3. Race and Ethnicity of Top 52 Metropolitan Areas (percent)

Metropolitan area Hispanic White African American
United States 32 45 16
Los Angeles-Long Beach-Santa Ana, CA 72 13 6
New York-Northern New Jersey-Long Island, NY-NJ-PA 49 20 19
Chicago-Joliet-Naperville, IL-IN-WI 45 26 24
Dallas-Fort Worth-Arlington, TX 57 24 15
Houston-Sugar Land-Baytown, TX 63 15 17
Miami-Fort Lauderdale-Pompano Beach, FL 56 15 25
Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Marietta, GA 34 27 35
Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 69 19 7
Phoenix-Mesa-Glendale, AZ 53 34 7
Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 20 39 33
Detroit-Warren-Livonia, MI 8 48 39
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA 49 21 10
San Diego-Carlsbad-San Marcos, CA 54 30 6
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 40 21 31
Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 31 49 16
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH 26 50 12
Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 24 49 10
Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL 39 37 19
San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 72 18 7
Denver-Aurora-Broomfield, CO 48 37 8
Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI 18 51 18
Sacramento–Arden-Arcade–Roseville, CA 36 36 10
St. Louis, MO-IL 5 61 30
Portland-Vancouver-Hillsboro, OR-WA 27 60 4
Austin-Round Rock-San Marcos, TX 55 31 7
Las Vegas-Paradise, NV 51 28 12
Columbus, OH 9 65 21
Cincinnati-Middletown, OH-KY-IN 7 70 20
Charlotte-Gastonia-Rock Hill, NC-SC 29 38 28
Cleveland-Elyria-Mentor, OH 11 50 36
Pittsburgh, PA 3 77 16
Indianapolis-Carmel, IN 19 54 22
Kansas City, MO-KS 22 54 19
Baltimore-Towson, MD 13 35 44
Nashville-Davidson–Murfreesboro–Franklin, TN 22 57 18
Fresno, CA 69 15 5
Memphis, TN-MS-AR 14 24 59
McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, TX 98 2 0
Oklahoma City, OK 26 50 13
Milwaukee-Waukesha-West Allis, WI 24 40 29
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA 62 17 3
Bakersfield-Delano, CA 71 19 5
Providence-New Bedford-Fall River, RI-MA 28 55 8
Tucson, AZ 51 36 3
Jacksonville, FL 14 51 31
Louisville/Jefferson County, KY-IN 12 64 21
El Paso, TX 91 6 2
New Orleans-Metairie-Kenner, LA 17 33 46
Salt Lake City, UT 37 52 3
Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA-NC 10 41 43
Birmingham-Hoover, AL 15 46 37
Raleigh-Cary, NC 35 38 23
Not in Census MSA with ≥ 50,000 low-income men age 18–44 20 60 14

Source: ASPE tabulations of the American Community Survey (2008–10).

Notes: Low-income men are age 18–44, live in families with incomes below 200 percent of the federal poverty level, and do not have four-year college degrees. African American refers to non-Hispanic African American or black and includes those who identified themselves in the decennial census as black or African American only.

White refers to non-Hispanic white and includes those who identified themselves in the census as white only. People of Hispanic origin may be of any race.

 

View full report

Preview
Download

"rpt_DemographicSnapshot.pdf" (pdf, 748.28Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®