A Compendium of Current Federal Initiatives in Response to the Olmstead Decision. CONSUMER-DIRECTED CARE CONFERENCE

07/10/2001

Funding Organizations:

  • Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA)
  • Administration on Aging (AoA)
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA)
  • Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE)
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJ)

Implementing Organization:

Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE), Office of Disability, Aging and Long-Term Care Policy (DALTCP)

Purpose:

This national conference, held June 10-12, 2001 in Washington, D.C., afforded an opportunity to share lessons learned from the various consumer-directed care models being used in states. It provided an opportunity for researchers, practitioners and policymakers to come together to:

  • synthesize and share results and experiences of consumer-directed care models,
  • disseminate information on successful practices of state financing and administrative organization models supporting consumer-directed care, and
  • stimulate debate on the implications of research and practice for policy development/planning around consumer-directed care.

Background:

It has been demonstrated that consumer-directed models are cost-effective for state governments and maximize choice and control in the delivery of personal assistance services. Advocates have long argued that persons with disabilities and chronic conditions should be afforded as much independence and autonomy as possible, without placing the consumer at risk. To date, over 27 states have implemented state and Medicaid-funded consumer-directed personal assistance programs. While states and consumers are quickly embracing consumer-directed models of care, policy questions, financing issues, and system design challenges remain, and may act as barriers for the development and expansion of consumer-directed care models.

The growth of consumer-directed models of personal assistance services in the public and private sectors is an important and continuing trend that is likely to have a significant impact on people with disabilities and the elderly. Yet, the development of a knowledge base that is available to state and federal policymakers as well as consumers and their advocates for the purpose of facilitating informed decision-making about managed care and disability, has only recently begun.

Description:

By sharing implementation experiences, this national conference addressed a variety of critical questions:

  • How best can a state design fiscal intermediary services?

  • What are the most effective consumer-directed care models for the elderly, people with physical disabilities, people with mental retardation or developmental disabilities, and people with mental illness?

  • How should fraud and abuse issues be addressed?

  • How can states best design programs so that it is easy for consumers to comply with federal tax laws?

  • How can states best help consumers to identify and access the needed support services that they want?

  • How are consumer protection design issues best taken into account?

  • Do preferred methods for costing out benefits exist?

  • What are reliable ways to measure quality of care in consumer-directed care models?

  • What information systems and counseling services are available to better assist consumers in hiring, firing, and managing their personal assistants?

Contact Information:

Andreas Frank, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, H.H. Humphrey Building, Room 424E, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, (202)401-7123

Pamela Doty, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, Department of Health and Human Services, H.H. Humphrey Building, Room 424E, 200 Independence Avenue, S.W., Washington, DC 20201, (202)690-5746

Information on this project is available from ASPE's website: http://aspe.hhs.gov/_/office_specific/daltcp.cfm.

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