Child Care Arrangements in Urban and Rural Areas. Hours in Care

06/30/2008

Figure 3a presents NHES data for the average number of hours children participated in care each week for three types of non-parental arrangements.  The averages include primary and all secondary care arrangements that regularly occurred at least once a week.[10]  Children that received care from multiple arrangements may be in more than one category.  In all three types of care, the averages were not statistically different between urban and rural children.

Figure 3a:
Average Number of Hours in Care per Week for Chldren Age 0 to 5 and Not Yet in Kindergarten

Figure 3a

Note:  This figure is restricted to children receiving non-parental care at least once a week.
  ** Urban/rural difference = p < 0.05
*** Urban/rural difference = p < 0.01

Figure 3b[11] presents additional comparisons of the average number of hours in care each week for all children, children living in families with mothers employed at least part-time, and for children living in families headed by single mothers employed at least part time.  Like the findings shown in the previous figure, the averages presented in Figure 3b were not statistically different between urban and rural children across all three categorizations.  Nationally, the average number of hours in care for all children, children with employed mothers, and children with employed single mothers was 29, 32, and 38 hours respectively.

Figure 3b:
Average Number of Hours in Care per Week for Children Age 0 to 5 and Not Yet in Kindergarten

Figure 3b

Note:  This figure is restricted to children receiving non-parental care at least once a week.
  ** Urban/rural difference = p < 0.05
*** Urban/rural difference = p < 0.01


[10]  When children received regular care in more than one arrangement of a given type the hours for each arrangement of that type were summed to create the total time in care for Figure 3a and Figure 3b.

[11]  The numbers in Figure 3b include hours in care from all types of care arrangements and are higher than those presented in Figure 3a.  Children may be in more than one category in these figures.

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