Characteristics of Long-Term Care Registered Apprenticeship Programs: Implications for Evaluation Design. 3.5. Program Completion

09/13/2011

Nationally, about half of long-term care apprentices in LTC RAPs since 2005 have either completed or are still participating in their program. At the two largest sites, the share of active apprentices or those who have completed of all enrollees (43% of all Developmental Services apprentices and 46% of all Good Samaritan apprentices) was less than the national share. Of the three smallest programs, Home Care Associates (96%), Air Force Villages (95%), and Agape (93%) have had greater success with retaining apprentices in the program and having them complete the program. Developmental Services’ difficulty in determining apprentices’ work ethic before enrollment may explain its higher dropout rate. The LTC RAPs at Developmental Services and Good Samaritan are also several years older on average than the relatively apprentices at Air Force Villages and Agape. The older programs’ dropout rates may reflect the fact that their apprentices have a higher “exposure” over time to the risk of dropping out. While the older programs may be more mature and perhaps even more effective as a result, the enthusiasm of the newer programs may help in retaining apprentices.

TABLE 2. Recruitment and Selection of Apprentices at Organizations Studied
Selection Characteristics Program Site
Indiana
Developmental Services
Program Site
Idaho
Good Samaritan
Program Site
Pennsylvania
Home Care Associates
Program Site
Texas
Air Force Villages
Program Site
South Carolina
Agape Senior
Characteristics of prospective apprentices Patient, caring individuals with “soft skills” who are detail oriented and able to carefully document the care they deliver Incumbent workers with good attendance, highly rated functional proficiency, and positive personal characteristics Incumbent workers with dedication to their work and successful performance in basic training Incumbent workers who are conscientious and have good attendance records Incumbent workers, most in the top 20% of CNA ranked by performance
Recruitment sources New hires solicited through newspaper ads, job fairs, word-of-mouth Incumbent workers Incumbent workers Incumbent workers Incumbent workers
Entry requirements Experience, dedication to the job; 75% of applicants are not hired Approval of manager Employment for at least 6 months, recommendations from supervisor and chief operating officer Employment for at least 3 months, approval of manager Recommendations from supervisor
Incentives for participation All new hires are required to participate in the apprenticeship program; wage increase commensurate with experience (typically a $1.25 per hour increase); receipt of state-recognized credential $0.25 and $0.50 raise in Boise and Idaho Falls, respectively, per competency training $0.20 raise per competency training ($1.20 in total), and a $200 bonus upon completion; receipt of state-recognized credential Increase of up to 8% of base salary upon completion for employees with shorter tenure; up to an 8% bonus for employees with longer tenure. $0.25 raise every quarter of class enrollment for a total of $1 for four quarters of study
Challenges recruiting apprentices Finding qualified applicants able to manage the stress of direct support work None None Identifying incumbent workers that are likely to complete apprenticeship None
SOURCE: Data collected from Interviews at and materials from LTC RAP sites, October 2010-June 2011.

Abbreviations: CNA (certified nursing assistant).

TABLE 3. Apprentice Characteristics at Organizations Studied
Apprentice Characteristics Program Site
Indiana
Developmental Services
Program Site
Idaho
Good Samaritan
Program Site
Pennsylvania
Home Care Associates
Program Site
Texas
Air Force Villages
Program Site
South Carolina
Agape Senior
Average age 38.7 years 37.8 years 43.1 years 42.6 years 41.1 years
Race/ethnicity African-American: 2.4%
White: 96.0%
Hispanic: 1.2%
Other: 0.4%
African-American: 2.8%
White: 87.4%
Hispanic: 6.2%
Other: 3.6%
African-American: 84.6%
White: 0.0%
Hispanic: 11.5%
Other: 3.9%
African-American: 8.1%
White: 14.5%
Hispanic: 74.2%
Other: 3.2%
African-American: 71.2%
White: 17.0%
Hispanic: 3.4%
Other: 8.5%
Gender Male: 17.3%
Female: 82.7%
Male: 8.7%
Female: 91.3%
Male: 7.7%
Female: 92.3%
Male: 8.1%
Female: 91.9%
Male: 0.0%
Female: 100.0%
Education levels High school diploma or more: 99.5%
Less than a high school diploma: 0.5%
High school diploma or more: 73.4%
Less than a high school diploma: 26.6%
High school diploma or more: 42.3%
Less than a high school diploma: 57.7%
High school diploma or more: 62.9%
Less than a high school diploma: 37.1%
High school diploma or more: 93.0%
Less than a high school diploma: 7.0%
Levels of training prior to starting apprenticeship Varied Varied Varied CNA Basic CNA
Barriers to completion of apprenticeship Low education rates makes teaching medical competencies challenging Apprenticeship is optional so many complete some competencies without completing the program None mentioned None mentioned None mentioned
SOURCES: Data collected from Interviews at and materials from LTC RAP sites, October 2010-June 2011; and calculations by authors, RAPIDS, January 2005-May 2011.

Abbreviations: CNA (certified nursing assistant).

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