An Assessment of the Sustainability and Impact of Community Coalitions once Federal Funding has Expired. Coalition Sustainability Status: Sustained or Not Sustained?

06/01/2012

Based on the survey results, NORC was able to classify the HCAP grantees according to their experiences sustaining their coalitions and activities. Exhibit 6 provides a breakdown of the sustainability of the community coalitions. The coalitions responded to questions about their goals; their responses were classified into categories according to the sustainability decision tree (Exhibit 1) that was first introduced in the conceptual framework.

Overall, 113 (68%) of the 163 responding coalitions were sustained. Nearly half (49%) of the sustained coalitions reported addressing all of their original goals from the HCAP grant. Of those 55, 33 (60%) expanded to add new goals while 22 (40%) did not add any additional goals. More than half (51%) of the sustained coalitions reported addressing at least one of their original goals from the HCAP grant. Of those 58, 43 (74%) expanded to add new goals and 15 (26%) did not add any new goals. None of the HCAP coalitions reported a coalition of three or more organizations that was not addressing at least one of its original goals.

In total, 76 (67%) of the 113 sustained coalitions are categorized as sustained and expanded, while 37 (33%) are categorized as sustained but not expanded (Exhibit 7, Boxes 9 and 11). Respondents provided reasons why they expanded to add one or more new goals. Of the 76 sustained coalitions that expanded, 13 percent reported expanding to attract new coalition members, 29 percent reported expanding to qualify for new funding sources, and 90 percent reported expanding to address new or additional needs of the community. Thirteen percent cited other reasons for expansion including expanding the coalition’s mission, aligning goals with the Affordable Care Act legislation, and leveraging and building upon the existing coalition to tackle new problems.

Fifty-two (32%) of the coalitions reported that there was no longer a coalition of three or more organizations, and as such these coalitions were considered to be not sustained. Of these, 35 (67%) of the coalitions dissolved due to issues such as funding or organizational problems and 17 (33%) disbanded because the coalition achieved all of its goals or was no longer needed in the community. The majority of the not sustained coalitions (61%) dissolved or disbanded between 2005 and 2007. Eighteen percent dissolved or disbanded between 2002 and 2005. Twenty one percent dissolved or disbanded between 2008 and 2010.

Exhibit 6: Sustainability of Community Coalitions
Sustainability of Community Coalitions Number Percent
All Responding Coalitions (Exhibit 7, Box 1) 165 100
Coalition of 3 or More Organizations (Box 2) 113 68
Overall, Not Sustained (Box 15) 52 32
Not Sustained and Dissolved (Box 12) 35 67
Not Sustained and Disbanded (Box 13) 17 33
Is coalition addressing 1 or more original goal? (Exhibit 7, Box 3) 113 100
Yes, sustained (Box 4) 113 100
No, but Addressing New Goals (Box 14) 0 0
Is coalition addressing all original goals? (Exhibit 7, Box 5) 113 100
Yes, fully Sustained (Box 6) 55 49
No, partially Sustained (Box 7) 58 51
Is fully sustained coalition addressing new goal(s)? (Exhibit 7, Box 8) 55 100
Yes, expanded 33 60
No, not expanded 22 40
Is partially sustained coalition addressing new goal(s)? (Exhibit 7, Box 10) 58 100
Yes, expanded 43 74
No, not expanded 15 26
Sustained (Exhibit 7, Box 4) 113 100
Overall, Sustained and Expanded (Box 9) 76 67
Overall, Sustained but Not Expanded (Box 11) 37 33

Exhibit 7: Sustainability Decision Tree

Exhibit 7: Sustainability Decision Tree

View full report

Preview
Download

"rpt.pdf" (pdf, 942.2Kb)

Note: Documents in PDF format require the Adobe Acrobat Reader®. If you experience problems with PDF documents, please download the latest version of the Reader®