An Assessment of Innovative Models of Peer Support Services in Behavioral Health to Reduce Preventable Acute Hospitalization and Readmissions. Appendix C. Peer SUPPORT Services Programs -- Brief Case Studies

12/01/2015

BALTIC STREET, AEH, INC. (BALTIC STREET)
9201 4th Avenue, Fifth Floor
Brooklyn, New York 11209
Phone: (718) 833-5929
Website: http://www.balticstreet.org/
Program Overview:
Baltic Street, AEH, Inc. (Baltic Street), established in 1996, is a peer-run, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to improving the quality of life for people living with mental illness. Baltic Street offers many types of support including programs focused on supported housing, self-help, employment, and Bridger programs. All programs are recovery-oriented to help recipients obtain jobs, housing, social supports, education, vocational training, entitlements, and other life-enhancing services. The Baltic Street Bridger Programs work with mental health recipients as they move from longer term state hospital residence into the community. Bridger staff initiate contact with the client while in the hospital and maintain contact once they transition into the community. The Bridger staff also work as a team to be a "special bridge" that helps recipients go back to living in the community and develop adequate community connections.
Program Catchment Area:
Self-help and advocacy programs span the boroughs of New York City. The Bridger program focuses on the following: Kingsboro Bridger Program in Brooklyn, works with adults who are in the discharge process from Kingsboro Psychiatric Center; South Beach Bridger Program in Staten Island, works with adults who are in the discharge process from South Beach Psychiatric Center; South Beach Lodge Bridger Program in Staten Island, works with adults enrolled in the South Beach Lodge I and II Residences Programs; and Optum Bridger Program, housed in Brooklyn.
Typology of Program:
Transition in levels of care; and community-based care to promote recovery and resiliency.
Program Model:
Bridger Model, which is similar to NYAPRS.
Peer Specialist Certification:
Program has training criteria, which includes completion of the NY Academy of Peer Support online training.1
Medicaid:
PSS is not Medicaid reimbursable in New York but the state is in the process of changing this.
Program Financing:
Baltic Street has contracts with the New York OMH and a managed care company, Optum Health. The contracts are deliverables based (number of clients worked with per month, etc.). The program is designated as a safety net provider. Funding is up to $5 million annually.
Data and Outcome:
All Baltic Street programs collect the following information: number of staff hours, number of people served, the types of needs reported by individuals transitioning from state hospitals. Optum Health has access to information regarding hospitalization stays for their clients.
Service Recipients:
Baltic Street serves 5,000 individuals annually across programs. Most clients have mental health or co-occurring mental and substance use conditions. The self-help and advocacy programs serve clients regardless of referral source. The Bridger Program serves clients who are being discharged from specific state hospitals. The Housing program serves clients from any referral source, but is currently full with a waiting list. A recent contract includes working with forensic clients, which does not allow for as much freedom of choice as PSS usually emphasizes.
Staff:
Of the 100 staff members, 90 are peers. All staff complete online training offered by the NY Academy of Peer Services.2 The online training covers WRAP, motivational interviewing, trauma-informed care, among other skills.
Site Contact:
Isaac Brown
Chief Executive Officer
ibrown@balticstreet.org

 

GEORGIA MENTAL HEALTH CONSUMER NETWORK, INC. (GMHCN) PEER SUPPORT, WELLNESS AND RESPITE CENTERS
246 Sycamore Street
Decatur, Georgia 30030
Phone: (800) 297-6146
Website: http://www.gmhcn.org/
Program Overview:
The Georgia Mental Health Consumer Network (GMHCN) is a non-profit corporation founded in 1991 by consumers of state services for mental health, developmental disabilities, and addictive diseases. While the GMHCN has a number of impressive peer-based programs, our discussion focused on their well-established Peer Support Wellness Center (PSWC). PSWCs are peer-run alternatives to a traditional mental health day program and psychiatric hospitalization and include a limited number of respite beds for those that are in crisis. PSWCs began in Decatur, Georgia in 2007. Two more PSWCs were opened in 2010 (Cleveland and Cartersville), and additional sites were started last year (Moultrie and McDonough). Each PSWC hosts daily wellness activities, a 24-hour warm telephone line, and 3 bedrooms for respite guests who receive 24 hour/day care for up to 7 days.
Program Catchment Area:
Five PSWCs across the State of Georgia in the cities of Decatur, Cleveland, Cartersville, Moultrie, and McDonough.
Typology of Program:
Crisis and respite services.
Program Model:
IPS services.
Peer Specialist Certification:
Certified peer specialists are required to meet state standards and provider standards. 80 hours of training are required and 12 hours of Continuing Education Credits are required annually to retain certification.
Medicaid:
PSS is Medicaid reimbursable in Georgia.
Program Financing:
The PSWCs are run by the GMHCN in partnership with, and funded through, a grant contract with Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Addictive Diseases of the Georgia Department of Human Resources. Their contract with the state requires that certain deliverables are met. Example deliverables include items such as: an average number of 2 respite beds are filled per day; an average of 10 calls are received at the call center per day; and an average of 5 participants participate in daily programming.
Data and Outcome:
A Recovery Oriented Systems of Care survey is presented to each individual during their stay. The survey is also presented to all daily participants during the final week of each month. The form is anonymous and voluntary, and the results are submitted for data analysis twice a year. No hospitalization records are collected or reported. The site also reports to the state the number of participants/service recipients who engage in the center's activities each month.
Service Recipients:
Individuals must be at least 18 years of age and self-identify as a person who is a consumer of mental health services. They must also have a house tour and sign Participation Guidelines before engaging in Center activities. There are no per-person costs that are billed to any payer. Respite guests must complete a "proactive interview" to determine suitability to stay at the Center and to begin developing a relationship. All individuals are self-referred and welcomed regardless of insurance status. No insurance information is requested.
Staff:
There are 7 certified peer specialists employed at each of the 5 PSWC centers. All are trained to work with peers with mental health conditions and have received first aid, CPR, and WHAM training to be whole health coaches. Some are additionally trained to work with addictions conditions. There are no clinical staff at the centers.
Site Contact:
Sherry Jenkins Tucker
Executive Director
sjtucker@gmhcn.org

 

HOUSING OPTIONS MADE EASY, INC. (HOUSING OPTIONS)
75 Jamestown Street
Gowanda, New York 14070
Phone: (716) 532-5508
Website: http://www.housingoptions.org/
Program Overview:
Housing Options Made Easy (Housing Options) is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit supported housing and community support services agency, developed and operated by and for recipients of mental health services. The program began in 1990 and seeks to help individuals facing mental health challenges to find affordable housing and jobs, and to explore educational opportunities. The program provides individuals with an alternative to homelessness, crisis, and hospitalization. Housing Options operates over 400 units of Section 8 housing in Western New York. Units are leased by Housing Options. In their programs in Monroe County, they have Peer Specialists work with individuals who have been in long-term state psychiatric hospitals and transition them to community housing. Housing Options also provides non-housing related community-based services programs, an employment and resiliency program aimed at transition-aged youth with behavioral health conditions, and STRAWW. STRAWW is a partnership project with other community support agencies. Two warm lines received over 4,000 phone calls last year.
Program Catchment Area:
Housing Options serves 6 New York State counties: Erie, Cattaraugus, Chautauqua, Allegany, Niagara, and Monroe.
Typology of Program:
Transition in levels of care; and community-based care to promote recovery and resiliency.
Program Model:
Program uses a supported housing model but revises the model to include a recovery focus and peer specialist involvement.
Peer Specialist Certification:
New York State OMH is developing a peer specialist certification process in conjunction with peer leaders.
Medicaid:
PSS is not Medicaid reimbursable in New York.
Program Financing:
The various programs are funded through contracts from the New York OMH, Office of County Mental Health, and Optum Health (managed care company). Housing Options also receives federal funding for housing. Since PSS is not covered under Medicaid within New York, there are no uniform rates for PSS. Contracts are performance based. Total funding exceeds $6 million/year.
Data and Outcome:
The program collects information from clients through surveys at intake and throughout the year. Self-report outcomes of interest include hospitalizations. A case management software program is used to track peer specialist contact with clients and what occurs at each contact. Some specific outcomes include: 90% of their clients do not seek hospitalization for psychiatric problems. Annual recipient surveys for the past 10 years have shown that 90% or more have less need for crisis intervention. In their program for transitioning individuals from long-term state hospitals into the community, more than 70% of the individuals have remained in the community for over 1 year. They estimate that cost savings from this transition program exceed $12 million annually.
Service Recipients:
Individuals are referred to Housing Options through a number of sources including managed care companies, community mental health centers, and other community support providers. Within the Supported Housing program, peer specialist work with clients to find out where they want to live and provide them with options for apartments, furnishing, and provide support that meets the needs of the client. Clients have a mental health or co-occurring mental health and substance use conditions. In the non-Supported Housing programs, clients work with peer specialist to identify employment and educational activities. The focus is on working with individuals to "ignite" the spark of life.
Staff:
There are 70 peer specialist staff members. All staff go through training provided by Housing Options and are supervised by a regional manager and training coordinator. In addition to traditional PSS training, peer specialists are trained in safety and risk management, note taking, and community support resources, among other items.
Site Contact:
Joe Woodward
Executive Director
joe@housingoptions.org

 

MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF SOUTHEAST PENNSYLVANIA (MHASP)
1211 Chestnut Street, Room 1100
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107
Phone: (215) 751-1800; (800) 688-4226
Website: http://www.mhasp.org/
Program Overview:
Mental Health Association of Southeast Pennsylvania (MHASP) is a non-profit corporation that is headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. MHASP maintains an additional 4 satellite locations in 4 counties that offer PSS. MHASP programs are mostly community-based and focus on 5 domains: advocacy, direct support to individuals, training and education, information and referral, and technical assistance. Its programs include Peer Support Teams, a Self-Directed Care Project, and Recovery and Education Centers. This case study focuses on their community Self-Directed Care Project and other similar community-based services provided in the state since the data collection is more robust for those programs. Generally, clients receive Medicaid and are referred to services. A fee-for-service model is used and Peer Specialists (PS) work with clients in the community or in a client's home. Program staff often work closely with traditional case managers to coordinate services.
Program Catchment Area:
Throughout Bucks, Chester, Delaware, Montgomery and Philadelphia counties.
Typology of Program:
Community-based to promote recovery and resiliency.
Program Model:
Program developed organically. No specific model was adopted. Currently working with Temple University to manualize their peer-delivered self-directed care program.
Peer Specialist Certification:
Certified Peer Specialists have lived experience and must complete 2 weeks of training and pass an exam. There are yearly continuing education units and opportunities for additional trainings.
Medicaid:
PSS is Medicaid reimbursable in Pennsylvania.
Program Financing:
MHASP uses a fee-for-service payment model. All clients have Medicaid coverage and are referred to MHASP for services. MHASP receives reimbursement from the state and from 3 managed care companies: Magellan, CBH, and CCBH. Peer specialists maintain electronic health records.
Data and Outcome:
Since MHASP maintains electronic health records, client contact data and self-report client data are available. In the past 5 years, the Delaware County site has worked with Temple University to conduct research looking at use of county reinvestment dollars for self-directed consumer care, compared with usual care. While the study has not yet been published, there are a lot of data on individuals who engaged in the program. Unfortunately, the study did not specifically focus on hospitalization, although it is possible there is some information about hospitalization rates in the data.
Service Recipients:
Service recipients have a mental health, or co-occurring mental health and substance use conditions. All clients are Medicaid recipients and are referred for services. Referrals come from managed care companies, community providers, and hospitals, among other sources. Services are provided on a time-limited basis within the community or in the client's residence. The program generally maintains a 1:25 peer specialist to client ratio.
Staff:
All program staff must complete the MHASP training. All peer specialists are WRAP certified. Some staff are specially trained to work with individuals with SUD. Staff generally work in the field (not an office setting). There is a separate training track for staff that only want to work with individuals in recovery from substance use problems.
Site Contact:
Joe Rogers
Chief Advocacy Officer
jrogers@mhasp.org

 

NEW YORK ASSOCIATION OF PSYCHIATRIC REHABILITATION SERVICES, INC. (NYAPRS) PEER SERVICES
194 Washington Avenue, Suite 400
Albany, New York 12210
Phone: (518) 436-0008
Website: http://www.nyaprs.org/peer-services/
Program Overview:
Since 1994, the New York Association of Psychiatric Rehabilitation Services (NYAPRS) Peer Bridger Program has helped individuals transition from New York State psychiatric centers into community life. The Peer Bridger Project employs Peer Bridgers, persons who have been successfully managing their own recovery from a psychiatric disability and have completed the requisite Peer Bridger Training Program offered by NYAPRS. Recently, NYAPRS has also begun work under contracts with managed care companies Optum Health (since 2010) and Healthfirst (since 2014). In collaboration with the managed care companies, NYAPRS had adapted the Peer Bridger Program to focus on transitioning individuals in non-state hospitals (stays up to 21 days) into the community.
Program Catchment Area:
Through their contract with New York State, NYAPRS delivers services in the following counties: Albany, Ulster, Broome, Queens, Suffolk, and Westchester. Through the managed care projects, services are delivered in Albany, Long Island, and New York City.
Typology of Program:
Transition in levels of care.
Program Model:
Peer Bridger model, based heavily on IPS model.
Peer Specialist Certification:
Current peer specialist requirements include 5 days of training conducted by NYAPRS. Additional, optional training includes specialization in housing and entitlements. Once New York State sets standards, peer specialists will be required to meet state standards.
Medicaid:
PSS is not Medicaid reimbursable in New York. However, this is in the process of changing and will affect the billing and reimbursement of these services.
Program Financing:
There are 3 funding streams for NYAPRS Peer Services. They have contracts with OMH, Optum Health, and Healthfirst. Currently, contracts do not tie funding to specific clients. However, clients are identified through referrals from the state or managed care companies. Services covered include outreach, engagement, and PSS delivery. Once Medicaid funding is available (estimated Summer 2015), there may be some changes to how services are financed.
Data and Outcome:
In 2008, the Peer Bridger Project looked at the hospital records for 176 individuals who participated in the program to transition from state hospitals into the community. These data showed that approximately 71% of the people were able to stay out of the state hospital in 2009. NYAPRS has access to and analyzes the state data at intervals. NYAPRS focuses on recovery variables, measures of outreach and engagement, and hospitalizations. Optum and Healthfirst analyze data independently of NYAPRS and look at hospitalization rates.
Service Recipients:
All clients engage in the program voluntarily and have a history of mental health and/or substance use conditions. Through the New York OMH contract, peer specialists meet with and work with clients in the state hospitals and then in the community. Through the managed care contracts, peer specialists work with telephonic case managers to identify individuals who have had 2 or more hospitalizations within 6 months. Much of the time is spent on outreach and engagement of these clients. In all programs, clients are increasingly self-referred.
Staff:
21 Peer Specials, 7 of them part-time. All staff are trained in WRAP, recovery support, IPS, and the NYAPRS model. Most staff work remotely and communicate with NYAPRS Albany staff through email and telephone. Weekly supervision and peer specialist group meetings occur by phone.
Site Contact:
Tanya Stevens
Director of Peer Services Division
tanyas@nyaprs.org

 

OPTUM, PIERCE COUNTY REGIONAL SUPPORT NETWORK
3315 South 23rd Street, Suite 210
Tacoma, Washington 98405
Phone: (253) 292-4200
Website: http://www.optumhealthpiercersn.com/portal/server.pt
Program Overview:
Optum is a UnitedHealth Group platform that focuses on population health management, care delivery and improving the clinical and operating elements of the health care system. Since 2009, Optum has served as the RSN for Pierce County, Washington. As the RSN, Optum coordinates mental health care for Medicaid beneficiaries (an eligible monthly population of approximately 135,500) through a network of inpatient, outpatient, and residential treatment providers. Through direct contracting with providers, Optum has changed the orientation of the Pierce County mental health system to be recovery oriented and staffed by a growing portion of Certified Peer Counselors (a.k.a., Peer Specialists) who work alongside of traditional mental health providers. Within the RSN, peers work in ED settings, in crisis centers, and in outpatient provider settings. Peers work with adults, youths, and families. Of particular interest to our study is their crisis stabilization unit, where 50% of the staff are peers, and which receives 220 referrals a month. Also of interest are their mobile crisis unit and living room program.
Program Catchment Area:
Pierce County, Washington.
Typology of Program:
Crisis and respite services; transition in levels of care; and community-based to promote recovery and resiliency.
Program Model:
Optum model.
Peer Specialist Certification:
Optum conducts its own training that meet Washington State certification standards. Optum is 1 of 3 training facilities within the state. Forty hours of training are required, as well as continuing education credits.
Medicaid:
Yes.
Program Financing:
Optum is contracted by the State of Washington. They received $85 million in Medicaid dollars, $15 million in state funding; and additional funds through the federal mental health block grant. Optum uses these funds to contract with providers in Pierce County. Optum develops detailed description of the services that are being contracted for and requires that all providers employ certified peer counselors. Peer services are billed to the state, much like other providers and at the same rate. Peers must chart their contact with clients.
Data and Outcome:
Optum's integrated provider system has allowed them to collect data on hospitalization, ED use, and health care cost. Optum notes a 32% reduction in hospitalization over 3 years, amounting to $7.3 million in savings.3
Service Recipients:
State of Washington Medicaid beneficiaries with mental health conditions (an eligible monthly population of approximately 135,500). Optum notes that it is in the process of becoming a behavioral health organization that addresses the needs of persons with mental health and/or substance use conditions. In rare cases where the person is not a Medicaid beneficiary, providers work with the client to help them complete paperwork for their entitlements.
Staff:
Optum notes that 248 peers are employed within their provider network. Through their training program, Optum has trained 464 peers and continues to conduct training sessions 2-3 times a year. All peers have a history of addressing mental health conditions and all are paid employees.
Site Contact:
Sue Bergeson
National Vice President, Consumer and Family Affairs
Susan.bergeson@optum.com

 

PROJECTS TO EMPOWER AND ORGANIZE THE PSYCHIATRICALLY LABELED, INC. (PEOPLe)
126 Innis Avenue
Poughkeepsie, New York 12601
Phone: (845) 452-2728
Website: http://projectstoempower.org/
Program Overview:
Projects to Empower and Organize the Psychiatrically Labeled, Inc. (PEOPLe) is a peer-run 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization that advocates for and provides services to people living with a mental health diagnosis. The organization is 100% peer-run. PEOPLe operates a number of PSS programs including crisis lines, warm lines, Bridger programs and hospital diversion programs. The various components work together and staff work across programs. Of particular interest to our study is the Rose House. The Rose House was developed in 2001 by PEOPLe and is a peer-operated hospital diversion program designed to alleviate emotional distress in a homelike safe and secure environment. This diversion program now has 4 locations/houses. The Rose House locations offer overnight stays of up to 5 days to assist individuals to develop new skills to maintain wellness. Peer specialists (PS) called "Peer companions" are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to address the needs of guests as they arise. Peer specialists are the key ingredient in helping guests learn the self-help tools. Peer specialists are compassionate, understanding and empowering. Peer specialists also maintain contact and support for guests, at their request, after they finish their stay at Rose House. Participation in the program is completely voluntary and free of charge. Guests are self-referred and may come and go as they please. A professional or family member may assist this process. A guest pre-registration screening process is used to ensure the comfort of other guests as well as the appropriateness of the program.
Program Catchment Area:
Orange/Ulster Counties -- Milton, NY; Putnam County -- Carmel, NY; Dutchess County -- Poughkeepsie, NY; Warren/Washington Counties -- Hudson Falls, NY
Typology of Program:
Crisis and respite services.
Program Model:
Developed their own model based on core values of recovery and wellness.
Peer Specialist Certification:
They have created their own training module, which requires 3 days of classroom training followed by immersion training by working in the house. Listening skills, motivational interviewing, WRAP, and trauma-informed care are also taught.
Medicaid:
PSS is not Medicaid reimbursable in New York.
Program Financing:
Funding is primarily provided by the New York State OMH. The program is deficit funded, meaning PEOPLe receives quarterly payments with which to serve as many individuals as they can. In addition, Putnam County took notice of the services offered and has supplied county dollars to the program. In order to supplement these funding streams, PEOPLe raises funds through consulting services they offer to others interested in setting up similar respite-type houses in their communities.
Data and Outcome:
Most of the data collected at the Rose Houses are self-reported by guests. Rose House staff survey guests on a daily basis to measure what activities are most utilized and effective. Most of the questions are qualitative in nature, such as, are they feeling better emotionally, mindful of their own thoughts and behaviors, or breaking internal barriers? Program efficacy is measured based on how many individuals PEOPLe is able to keep out of the hospital, specifically the ED. These data are also self-reported and collected from the individuals during follow-up interviews. The program does a 30-day callback of the diversion program participants to see if individuals have used the hospital since they left the diversion program. At the 30-day mark, nearly 100% report that they did not return to the hospital since leaving the diversion house. Recently, individuals who had used the diversion house were called back 2 years after they used the services. Approximately 90% have not needed to go to the hospital for psychiatric problems since receiving diversion services. Local estimates show that each diversion house is saving the system $4 million a year. Local area hospitals were measuring their recidivism rates to be about 25%. PEOPLe utilizes these collected data for their state reports. They have also worked with the College of St. Rose to analyze satisfaction data. Individuals who have stayed at Rose House rate it at a very high satisfaction level.
Service Recipients:
The Rose House is available to any resident of Orange, Ulster, Dutchess, and Putnam Counties ages 18 years old and over experiencing a psychiatric crisis or emotional distress. The program is strictly voluntary and guests are self-referred. A professional or family member may assist this process. A guest pre-registration screening process is used to ensure the comfort of other guests as well as the appropriateness of the program.
Staff:
There are approximately 65 peer specialists employed by Rose House. Each location is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Each house has between 15-18 staff members assigned. Staff consists of both full-time and part-time employees, all of whom identify as peers. There are non-peer staff on-site.
Site Contact:
Steve Miccio
Chief Executive Officer
stevemiccio@projectstoempower.org

 

RECOVERY INNOVATIONS (RI)
2701 N. 16th Street, Suite 316
Phoenix, Arizona 85006
Phone: (602) 525-3003
Website: http://www.recoveryinnovations.org/riaz/RIHomepage.html
Program Overview:
Formerly known as META Services, RI was founded in 1990 and maintains programs throughout Maricopa County, centralized in Phoenix, Arizona. In most RI programs, Peer Specialists work in integrated teams with nurses, psychiatrists, psychologists, and social workers. All providers are RI employees. A range of services is offered based on the needs of the service recipient and include inpatient voluntary/involuntary alternative to hospitalization (Recovery Response Center West), living room programming for individuals transitioning out of inpatient care, and community PSS with supported housing and temporary community housing components. RI services are meant to provide a continuum of services that meet the diverse needs of those with SMI as they navigate their recovery journey.
Program Catchment Area:
Programs are run throughout Maricopa County, Arizona. Many are based in Phoenix.
Typology of Program:
Crisis and respite services; transition in levels of care; community-based to promote recovery and resiliency.
Program Model:
Whole Health, integrated PSS with other provider services. Other models including living room model, supported housing, and intentional peer specialist.
Peer Specialist Certification:
RI offers 80 hours of state certified peer specialist training. An identical curriculum is also available in Louisiana and Pennsylvania. Once hired, all staff (including non-peers) must complete 40 hours of recovery oriented training.
Medicaid:
PSS is Medicaid reimbursable in Arizona.
Program Financing:
Annual revenues of $12 million come from the State of Arizona Department of Health Services through a contract with the RBHA for Maricopa County, the Arizona Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Peer Community Connections program is covered through a contract with Magellan and is open only to people who have Non-Title 19 services in the Magellan SMI Program. Non-Title 19 SMI services are behavioral health services for persons who have SMI but do not qualify for Arizona's Medicaid program (Arizona Health Care Cost Containment System). There is a children and adolescent program out of Phoenix Children's Hospital that is funded through Aetna. RI bills a flat fee-for-services to Medicaid. Most programs will serve anyone who presents themselves regardless of insurance or state residency. They do not bill third-party insurance. Peer specialists provided over $6 million in reimbursable services at RI during 2006.
Data and Outcome:
Since this is a medical facility, Level 1 Sub-Acute Health care facility and licensed by JACO, there are medical records and records of peer specialists are integrated with other provider staff. The program collects information during the intensive intake process (for the inpatient clinic), including social history and where service recipients go to live after they leave the inpatient or living room programs. The inpatient program has a 72-hour follow-up with clients. The program states that their data show that the PSS programs have saved the state over $10 million by helping people stay out of the hospital. Since the implementation of a recovery mission, hospitalizations have decreased to the current rate of 4%. In 2 other counties where RI has provided PSS training, the data show that they have reduced hospitalization rates by 25% within 6 months. (Data from 2003-2004.)
Service Recipients:
RI provides services to over 10,000 adults with SMI and substance use issues. While most programs are open to any consumer with SMI, most service recipients are Medicaid eligible or qualify for Non-Title 19 SMI services. Some family programs serve families with SMI members.
Staff:
PS are integrated into service teams. Peer specialists make up 75% of RI's 40-member staff. In the inpatient Recovery Response Center there is a physician on staff at all times (24 hours/7 days a week), but this is not true for all PSS offered.
Site Contact:
Lisa St. George
Director of Recovery Practices
lisas@recoveryinnovations.org

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