Assessing the Feasibility of Creating and Maintaining a National Registry of Child Maltreatment Perpetrators: Research Report. CHAPTER 1. BACKGROUND

09/01/2012

This report discusses the feasibility of implementing a national registry of child abuse and neglect perpetrators. It addresses the gaps in information identified by the initial interim feasibility study conducted by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE).[1] The identified gaps included:

  • the frequency of perpetrators who offend in more than one State
  • the capacity of State data systems to meet the needs of a national registry
  • the level of State interest in participating in a national registry
  • factors that would hinder or foster participation

Underlying the design, implementation and maintenance of a national registry is the actual nature of the data that would be included in a registry, the ability of the States to provide data, and the interest in obtaining data from a registry. The report is organized to address these concerns. The conclusion synthesizes the findings in terms of the key gaps of information that were identified by the Interim Report. The report has the following chapters.

  • Chapter 1. Background—A summary discussion of the history of registries, the legislation behind the development of a national registry, key findings of the Interim Report, and the methodologies used in this study.
  • Chapter 2. Current Environment—An overview of the current Federal and State policies and State practices that underlie any development of a national registry.
  • Chapter 3. Providing Data about Perpetrators to a National Registry—Findings as to the legal, practice, and technological issues that would impact the ability of States to provide data to a national registry.
  • Chapter 4. Inquiring About Perpetrators from a National Registry—Findings as to the legal, practice and technological practices that would influence the usage of a national registry by States. In addition, this chapter discusses the results of the prevalence study.
  • Chapter 5. Conclusions—The concluding chapter synthesizes the findings of this study in terms of the key gaps of information identified by the Interim Report.

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