Adoption USA. A Chartbook Based on the 2007 National Survey of Adoptive Parents. Rehabilitative Services and Other Supports Not Specific to Adoption

11/01/2009

Mental health care and tutoring were the most common services received by adopted children that were not specifically designed for or targeted to adoptive families. Among adopted children ages 5 and over, 39 percent received mental health care and 36 percent received tutoring. Families of one out of five adopted children received family counseling (20 percent). Thirteen percent of adopted children ages 5 or older had ever had a mentor. Less common services include psychiatric residential treatment or hospitalization, and drug and alcohol services for adopted adolescents, as well as crisis counseling. Over one-third of adopted children received at least one rehabilitative service, such as family or crisis counseling, in-patient or out-patient mental health care, or drug or alcohol treatment services.

For most services not specifically designed for or targeted to adoptive families, fewer than one out of ten adopted children have parents who said they wanted but did not receive each particular service. The most frequently mentioned services that had been desired but not received were mentoring and tutoring (11 percent for each service). For other services, reports that services were needed but not received were rarer; see Figure 41. Looking across all of the supports not specific to adoption, just over one out of five dparents (21 percent) reported that at least one
needed support was not received.

Receipt of a few services varies by adoption type; typically, children adopted from foster care are more likely than other adopted children to have received each service. In particular, nearly half of children adopted from foster care have received some type of rehabilitative service (46 percent), compared with 34 percent of children adopted from other domestic sources and 29 percent of children adopted internationally. Nearly one-half of children ages 5 and older adopted from foster care (46 percent) received mental health care compared with about one-third of children adopted domestically through other sources or internationally (33 and 35 percent, respectively).iii

Children adopted from foster care are also more likely than U.S. children adopted privately or internationally adopted children to have received crisis counseling, and, among those ages 5 and older, they are more likely than internationally adopted children to have had a mentor; see Figure 42. The percentage of adopted children who failed to receive at least one needed service also varies by adoption type. Twenty-six percent of children adopted from foster care have parents who reported an unfilled need compared with 16 percent of children adopted internationally.

Figure 41. Percentage of adopted children whose parents wanted to receive various post-adoption services (general) but did not

Figure 41. Percentage of adopted children whose parents wanted to receive various post-adoption services (general) but did not

Figure 42. Percentage of adopted children whose parents received various post-adoption services (general), by adoption type

Figure 42. Percentage of adopted children whose parents received various post-adoption services (general), by adoption type

Note: Values corresponding to unreliable percentage estimates have been suppressed in this figure.

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