Adoption USA. A Chartbook Based on the 2007 National Survey of Adoptive Parents. Adoption-specific Supports

11/01/2009

The most commonly reported service received was meeting with someone from the adoption agency to discuss post-adoption services (35 percent). Participating in a parent support group, participating in parent trainings, and using web-based resources are services that the parents of about three out of ten children received regardless of adoption type. A less common service is participation in support groups for children; 11 percent of adopted children ages 5 and older have ever participated in such a group.

A minority of parents said they wanted but did not receive services. For example, few adopted children (7 percent) have a parent who reported not having met with someone at the agency to discuss post-adoption services, but wanting to. For each of the other services, just over one out of ten children had a parent who reported having wanted but not received a service (16 percent for children’s support groups, 12 percent for parent trainings, 11 percent for parent support groups); see Figure 39. Overall, three out of ten adopted children have a parent who reported that at least one needed adoption-specific support was not received.

Receipt of post-adoption services varies by adoption type, with children adopted internationally typically the most likely to have parents who received particular services. One-half of children adopted internationally (50 percent) have a parent who met with someone from the adoption agency to discuss post-adoption services, compared with just over one-third of children adopted from foster care and one-quarter of those adopted domestically through other sources (36 and 25 percent, respectively). Similarly, children adopted internationally are more likely to have participated in a support group for children ages 5 and up, to have had a parent participate in a support group,i and to have a parent who used web-based resources about adoption. However, the percentage of adopted children with a parent who participated in parent training after the adoption was finalized is higher for foster care adoptions than for private domestic or international adoptions (38 percent, compared with 25 and 29 percent, respectively); ii see Figure 40.

The majority of children adopted from foster care receive an adoption subsidy and health insurance coverage through an adoption agreement. Over three-quarters of children adopted from foster care (78 percent) receive a monthly adoption subsidy payment. Nearly two-thirds (64 percent) have an adoption agreement guaranteeing both an adoption subsidy and health insurance coverage.

Figure 39. Percentage of adopted children whose parents wanted to receive various post-adoption services (adoption specific) but did not

Figure 39. Percentage of adopted children whose parents wanted to receive various post-adoption services (adoption specific) but did not

Figure 40. Percentage of adopted children whose parents received various post adoption services (adoption specific), by adoption type

Figure 40. Percentage of adopted children whose parents received various post adoption services (adoption specific), by adoption type

 

MEASURES RELATED TO POST-ADOPTION SUPPORTS

Adoption agreement, health insurance coverage, and monthly subsidies: Parents reported whether they had an adoption agreement at the time of their child’s adoption. Such agreements may include monthly maintenance payments from the agency, health insurance coverage, and other services such as therapy. For parents who volunteered that they receive a monthly financial subsidy or whose child was covered by public health insurance, we examined whether these supports were part of the adoption agreement.

Other supports: Parents reported whether they or their child had received a variety of services and whether they had wanted to receive each service. The services included:

  • Parents meeting with someone at an adoption agency after the adoption was finalized to discuss post-adoption services and supports
  • Adoption support groups for children ages 5 and older
  • Adoption support groups for parents
  • Classes, conferences, lectures, or seminars for parents about adoption
  • Internet-based resources with information on adoption-related issues
  • Family counseling
  • Crisis counseling
  • Mental health care or counseling for children ages 5 and older
  • Psychiatric hospital, group home, or residential treatment center for children ages 8 and older
  • Alcohol or drug evaluation and/or treatment for children ages 13 and older
  • A mentor for children ages 5 and older
  • An academic tutor for children ages 5 and older

Rehabilitative services: The rehabilitative services considered here include family counseling; crisis counseling; mental health care or counseling for children; treatment in a psychiatric hospital, group home, or residential treatment center; and alcohol or drug evaluation and/or treatment for children.

 

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